EN2100 October 16 - EN2100 October 16 Eulogy speech made in honour of dead person supposed to be positive Elegy lament formal poem reflecting seriously

EN2100 October 16 - EN2100 October 16 Eulogy speech made in...

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EN2100: October 16 Eulogy: speech made in honour of dead person; supposed to be positive Elegy: lament, formal poem reflecting seriously on a solemn subject. Poem about loss, sorrow, or meditation on a serious problem. Poems can be an elegy or just elegiac. Is not one thing; identified by subject matter, associated with a particular poetic foot. Ancient Greece, only written in dactyls /--: falling rhythm, falls away with it’s own inherent heaviness. Milton, Lycidas: Many dactyls, writing for an informed reader who recognises the meter and genre. Ancient Greek elegy: 6 dactyls, followed by 5 dactyls. Represents subject matter through form. Motif: “a situation, incident, idea, image, or character-type found in many different literary works, folktales or myths; or any element of a work that is repeated: “ Ubi sunt qui ante nos fuerunt?” – where are they who have been taken before us? Loss of loved ones, friends, rulers…. Meditation on mortality Most vivid motif found in ‘The Wanderer’ (JRR Tolkien – ‘Two Towers’ – Scene 37) This motif of loss and grief is always visible in elegies. Anglo-Saxon poetry emphasised by ‘kenning’ – a poetic phrase or metaphorical compound which is a substitution of terms for everyday language – a way of waxing poetic about typical, mundanities.

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