Chapter 14 notes - Chapter 14 Sound Producing a Sound Wave...

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Chapter 14 Sound Producing a Sound Wave Sound waves are longitudinal waves traveling through a medium A tuning fork can be used as an example of producing a sound wave Using a Tuning Fork to Produce a Sound Wave Using a Tuning Fork, cont. Using a Tuning Fork, final As the tuning fork continues to vibrteate a succession of waves move Categories of Sound Waves Audible waves Lay within the normal range of hearing of the human ear Normally between 20 Hz(can be heard by people, but not all people) to 20,000 Hz (some young people can hear it) Infrasonic waves Frequencies are below the audible range Earthquakes are an example Ultrasonic waves Frequencies are above the audible range Dog whistles are an example Applications of Ultrasound Can be used to produce images of small objects Widely used as a diagnostic and treatment tool in medicine Ultrasonic flow meter to measure blood flow May use piezoelectric devices that transform electrical energy into mechanical energy Reversible: mechanical to electrical Ultrasounds to observe babies in the womb Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator (CUSA) used to surgically remove brain tumors Ultrasonic ranging unit for cameras Speed of Sound in a Liquid In a liquid, the speed depends on the liquid’s compressibility and inertia V= √В/ρ √(Elastic property/ inertial property) B is the Bulk Modulus of the liquid ρ is the density of the liquid Compares with the equation for a transverse wave on a string Speed of Sound in a Solid Rod The speed depends on the rod’s compressibility and inertial properties
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Y is the Young’s Modulus of the material ρ is the density of the material Speed of Sound, General The speed of sound is higher in solids than in gases The molecules in a solid interact more strongly The speed is slower in liquids than in solids Liquids are more compressible Speed of Sound in Air V=(331m/s)√(T/273 K) 331 m/s is the speed of sound at 0° C T is the absolute temperature What is the speed of sound at 0 degrees Celsius? What is the speed of sound at 25 degrees Celsius? As the temperature goes up so does the speed of sound Whuch of the following actions will increase the speed of sound in air? Quick quiz
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHYS 221 taught by Professor Jacobs during the Winter '08 term at Eastern Michigan University.

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Chapter 14 notes - Chapter 14 Sound Producing a Sound Wave...

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