class_10_student_version_urban_sustainability_case_study_in_mexico_city

Class_10_student_version_urban_sustainability_case_study_in_mexico_city

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GOG 220 Urban Geography Class #10 (2/28) Urban Sustainability   Case Study VI:  Squalor in the  Suburbs, Mexico City  Reading : Hall Ch 9     
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Urban sustainability (Hall Ch  9) The major themes/issues raised in this Chapter  (which will be illustrated here with case  study material from Atlanta and Mexico City)  are: The link between cities and the environment: - cities as a threat to the environment, in  terms of resource use, land loss etc -  the environment as a threat to cities  and  their inhabitants - social processes as mediators of  enviornmental impacts and costs; risks from env threats are disproportionately 
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Defining some terms: the ecological  “footprint” sustainability, and  urban sustainability ecological  modernization the “greening” of  capitalism (paying for  the “right” to pollute) “greenwash” (branch  plants of TNC’s do  not follow the lead)
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Ecological Footprint  accounts  estimate how may Earths were needed  to meet the resource requirements of  humanity for each year since 1961,  when complete UN statistics became  available.  Resource demand  (Ecological  Footprint) for the world as a whole is  the product of population times per  capita consumption, and reflects both  the level of consumption and the  efficiency with which resources are  turned into consumption products.  Resource supply  (biocapacity) varies  each year with ecosystem  management, agricultural practices  (such as fertilizer use and irrigation),  ecosystem degradation, and weather.   This global assessment shows how  the size of the human enterprise  compared to the biosphere, and to  what extent humanity is in ecological  http://www.footprintnetwork.org/gfn_sub.p
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Sustainability embodies "stewardship" and "design with nature," well  established goals of the design professions and "carrying capacity,"  a highly developed modeling technique used by scientists and  planners.  the most popular definition of sustainability can be traced to a 1987 UN conference.  It defined sustainable developments as those that " meet present needs without  compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs "(WECD,  1987). Robert Gillman, editor of the  In Context  magazine, extends this goal oriented  definition by stating "sustainability refers to a very old and simple concept (The  Golden Rule). .. do onto future generations as you would have them do onto  you ."  these well-established definitions set an ideal premise, but do not clarify specific  human and environmental parameters for modeling and measuring sustainable  developments. The following definitions are more specific: 
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Class_10_student_version_urban_sustainability_case_study_in_mexico_city

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