{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

class_12_student_version_urban_theory_i_modernism_and_marxism

Class_12_student_version_urban_theory_i_modernism_and_marxism

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
GOG 220 Urban Geography Class #12 (3/6) Urban Theory I: Modernism  and Marxism     Case  Study VII: Reforming the  Victorian City Reading: Hubbard Ch1, 9-42    
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hubbard Ch 1, pp. 9-42 The main goal of this Chapter, Hubbard  states, is to review the nature and  evolution of urban theory over the past  century and a half; some of the key  concepts and ideas that you must be  familiar with/know about include the  following:  what is theory, at the “big” and the “small”  level? Hubbard’s “loose” definition of theory:  “an attempt to think space in a new manner”  (p. 10) what is theory supposed to do, in regard to  cities?
Background image of page 2
Modernity and the City beginning in the late 19 th  century, urbanization  became to be the norm for humanity…at first  in the west, then around the globe the major stimulus for this change, and for the  transformation from rural to urban societies  was: industrialization, and the industrial revolution;  defining modernity (see next slides)? the key here was the way people would come  to interpret/feel/live modernity, eg Berman, p.  13: “ all that is solid melts into air” (quoting marx)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
a. Modernism: the roots, theories, and  branches
Background image of page 4
Until recently, the word  "modern" used to refer  generically to the  contemporaneous; all  art is modern at the  time it is made: for example, in his  Il Libro  dell'Arte  (translated as  "The Craftsman's  Handbook") in 1437,  Cennino Cennini explains  that Giotto made painting  “modern”; and Giorgio Vasari writing  in 16th-century Italy  refers to the art of his  own period as “modern” as an art history term,  “modern” refers to a period  dating from roughly the  1860s through the 1970s  and is often used to  describe the style and the  ideology of art, architecture  and urban design produced  during that era;
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
art historians speak of  modern art as concerned  primarily with essential  qualities of color and  flatness and as exhibiting  over time a reduction of  interest in subject matter; it is generally agreed that  É douard Manet was the first  modernist painter, and that  modernism in art originated  in the 1860s. Paintings such  as his  Le D é jeuner sur  l'herbe  are seen to have  ushered in the era of  modernism... 
Background image of page 6
Modernism  . . .  "defines a specific form of artistic  production, serving as an umbrella term for  a melange of artistic schools and styles  which first arose in late-nineteenth-century  Europe and America... 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
alternatively:
Background image of page 8
Modernism:  “a general term applied retrospectively to the  wide range of experimental and avant-garde  trends in the literature (and other arts and  the sciences) of the early 20th century ....
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}