ENG_305_TrialRevision.docx - XXXXXX Maggie Wheeler ENG 305 14 April 2017 The Lucid Killer The Case of Peggy Barsness When Mary Barnett took off for

ENG_305_TrialRevision.docx - XXXXXX Maggie Wheeler ENG 305...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 11 pages.

XXXXXX Maggie Wheeler ENG 305 14 April 2017 The Lucid Killer: The Case of Peggy Barsness When Mary Barnett took off for California in hopes of mending her relationship with her fiancé, Tim, she left her entire life and all responsibilities behind. In doing so, she lost more than she bargained for. Her infant daughter, Alison, had been left alone during the duration of her excursion and had passed away of dehydration. Mary’s obsession over her relationship consumed her completely, especially when Tim moved to California. She never considered Alison’s needs. For all of Alison’s life, Mary’s attention was always somewhere else, so much so that she did not realize that little Alison was not with a baby sitter. Her depression and anxiety, many times, got the best of her. However in the case of Peggy Barsness, the story is a bit different. Though she was still consumed by thoughts of her fiancé, she was a bit more lucid than Mary. The factors that determine whether or not someone is guilty of second degree murder were not on Peggy’s side. After re-examining the new evidence, Peggy Barsness is guilty of second degree murder. Though Mary Barnett was not mentally stable at the time of the incident, Peggy Barsness was perfectly lucid when she left her baby behind. Several times during both of the cases, the topic of mental illness is mentioned. The jury knows from all of the witness accounts that both Peggy and Mary’s mental disorders hindered them from being responsible, rational mothers. During Mary’s case, Dr. Blooms told the jury that Ms. Barnett had suffered from not only
Image of page 1
postpartum depression, but also anxiety. After having Alison, Mary slipped further and further into this depressive hole that caused her to feel detached from her baby. Normally, victims of postpartum depression seek the help of a therapist in order to prevent the child or the mother from getting hurt. It is this depression that caused Mary to drink as much as she did. Peggy’s detachment from her daughter did not stem from postpartum depression, like Mary. Peggy did not want to have a child to begin with-- she had no business keeping Kirsten. In the article, The Cradle Will Fall, Peggy said, “I can’t have the baby… I’m just not ready to have a baby” (185). With this statement, it becomes obvious to the jury that she knew from the beginning of her pregnancy that she would not be a proper mother. In a poor attempt to escape reality, Ms. Barnett and Ms. Barsness used alcohol. The first witness, Caroline Hospers, stated that Mary’s “garbage was always filled with wine and whisky bottles” (2). From this statement, the jury can gather that Ms. Barnett had an excessive drinking problem; whether or not the drinking was in a party atmosphere is debatable. Peggy’s drinking was, absolutely, done in a party atmosphere; in the article The Cradle Will Fall, Peggy’s lawyer said that after she had Kirsten, she would hang out at a bar called the R-Berry. It is obvious from his testimony that a new mother has no business hanging out in a smoky dive bar. Several witnesses of both cases mentioned the anxiety of both
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture