HY_104_Midterm - Sawyer Callahan Professor Steinbock-Pratt...

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Sawyer Callahan Professor Steinbock-Pratt History 104 12 October 2020 In what ways did Americans embrace or reject dramatic social and cultural changes in the decade after World War I? The Roaring Twenties represented an era of drastic social and political change in history. More Americans lived in towns for the first time than on farms. Between 1920 and 1929, the overall wealth of the country more than doubled, and this economic development swept many Americans into a wealthy but unknown "market culture." People bought the same items from coast to coast, listened to the same music, performed the same dances, and even used the same slang. The most familiar image of the "Roaring Twenties" is undoubtedly the flapper: a young woman with bobbed hair and short skirts who, in addition to being more sexually free than previous generations, drank, smoked and said what could be considered unladylike things. 1 In fact, none of these things were done by most young women in the 1920s, but even those women who were not flappers gained some unparalleled liberties. They could actually vote: the right had been guaranteed in 1920 by the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. Millions of women

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