Lorax_Write_Your_Ending_-_final (2).docx - The Lorax...

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The Lorax: What’s Your Ending? . . . Unless Someone Like You Cares an Awfully Lot Lesson Authors: Victoria Neubert Kelly Johnson Micah Slover Renee Litterell Erin Moody edited by Dr. Rita Littrell FOCUS: Overview: This lesson uses Dr. Seuss unique and creative writing style to teach basic economic understandings about wants, production, costs and benefits to readers of ages eight to eighteen. It emphasizes creative and critical thinking combined with writing and presentation skills. After reading parts of the original The Lorax story by Dr. Seuss, students are asked to work in groups to write their own ending to the story. Each group performs their ending for the class. Length: Six days - 30 minutes a day Grade Levels: 2 to 8 PREPARE: Materials: Items needed for this lesson: 1) The book, The Lorax by Dr. Seuss. 2) Props for students to use for skits. 3) Handouts of Costs/Benefits Analysis and Skit Evaluation for each student. TEACH: Day one: 1) Read The Lorax to the page where the Whisper-ma-Phone is dropped to his ear. 2) Ask students to speculate on why they think the Lorax was lifted away. 3) Show the illustrations on the first two pages. Ask students to note what they see. Hopefully, they will say that it is very grey and ugly. They will state that there are no trees or plants except Grickle-grass. 4) Ask students to generate ideas about what might have happened to the trees and plants.
5) Define natural resources ‘gifts of nature’; things that are present without human intervention. These include trees, plants, soil, minerals, sunshine, etc. Ask students to name natural resources they can think of. Keep an ongoing list where they can add things as they think of them. 6) Ask the students to think about natural resources as you read the story. Day two: 1) Read the book from the beginning to the page where he sells the first Thneed for $3.98. 2) Ask a few students to describe what the Onceler saw when he first discovered the Truffala Trees. Descriptions should include pond, trees with bright-colored tufts, white clouds, Swomee-Swans, Brown Bar-ba-loots, Truffala fruits, and Humming-Fish. 3) Ask the following questions. Define natural resources. ( gifts of nature; naturally occurring resources ) Have you found any natural resources in the story? ( All the resources listed in # 11 above would be natural resources. ) 4) Describe the tufts of the Traffula Trees. Descriptions should include softer than silk and smell of fresh butterfly milk. Can you think of a different name for butterfly milk? This would be nectar. This is a good time to discuss writing and the interesting way authors choose to use description words. Dr. Seuss was a master at this. His writing and illustrations were very whimsical. 5) What did the Onceler do once he discovered this natural place? ( Built a small shop and chopped down a Truffala Tree to knit a Thneed. ) 6) Ask students to describe the Lorax to emphasize the fun and interesting language used by Dr.

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