NS 115 Term Paper

NS 115 Term Paper - Nighttime Caloric Intake and Weight...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Nighttime Caloric Intake and Weight Gain John Zhe Xu Nutritional Sciences 115 December 1, 2006 1 Nighttime Caloric Intake and Weight Gain The effects of eating food at night on increase in body weight is a controversy that is of concern to the population, especially for individuals involved in jobs that require long hours and working at night. Studies done using questionnaires show that eating at night could be a potential factor for weight gain in night shift workers. The same concept is supported in other data seen in studies involving obese outpatients of a weight loss program. The occurrence of a specific disorder known as night eating syndrome, found in only 0.4% of average weight individuals, increases greatly in the obese outpatients, to as much as 10%. (Gluck, et al . 2001) Despite the evidence supporting the weight gain of individuals who eat at night, other studies do not show the same results. In experiments done on rhesus monkeys for example, researchers found that there was no correlation between eating at night and a greater increase in weight gain than eating during the day. Through the analysis of the results presented by various researchers, it cannot be concluded that eating at night actually results in weight gain, but rather, while a correlation may exist, nighttime caloric intake has no direct effect on weight gain. In a single blind study done by Geliebter et al . (2000) using questionnaires, individuals working various shifts at a hospital were asked questions regarding their eating, sleeping, exercise patterns as well as any other health concerns. The researchers based this experiment on the premise of evidence that higher triacylglycerol levels were present in people who worked rotating shifts. The study also cited another reference, stating that the higher triacylglycerol levels are associated with increased body weight. With these ideas as the basic guidelines for the study, the researchers decided to investigate the effects of late night shifts on weight gain, supplemented by data collected regarding the subjects’ patterns of eating, exercise and sleep. The subjects of the study were all hospital personnel, chosen based on their fixed work schedules, during either the day or night. The 2 questionnaires administered consisted of 45 questions regarding demographics, work and weight history, health and medical history, and sleep and meal patterns. Subjects that had health conditions were excluded from the analysis. The final sample size was 85 individuals, consisting of 46 females and 39 males. 49 subjects worked the night shift, and 36 worked the day shift. The ages of the subjects for the day and night groups were 45.2 ± 11.0 years and 41.6 ± 12.6 years respectively....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 12

NS 115 Term Paper - Nighttime Caloric Intake and Weight...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online