class notes midterm 2 - Notes from Class: Midterm II TEST 2...

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Notes from Class: Midterm II TEST 2 will cover text book chapter 3-10 PSYC 3040 Notes 2-8-08 Auditory Pathology Four types of problems in hearing Delivery to sound receptors Damage to receptors Damage to neural transmission system/pathway Damage to auditory cortex Conductive Hearing Loss Outer-ear disorders Blockages Ear wax, objects Malformations Closed outer ear Cauliflower ear Ruptured eardrum Diving accident, fever, loud noise Treated with medication, surgery Middle-ear disorders Otis media Cholesteatoma Middle ear infection leads to fluid buildup Treatment: antibiotics, surgery Otosclerosis Stapedectomy Growth of bone in the middle ear affects stapes Genetic – Beethoven had it Note: can still have bone conduction with these types of conductive hearing loss Sensori-neural Hearing Loss Presbycusis (“old hearing”) Loss of sensitivity Greater loss at higher frequencies Accompanies aging Due to deterioration of hair cells, neural fibers Influenced by cultural, environmental exposure ( in addition to just aging) Can contribute to social/psychiatric issues Worse with gradual onset Compare to presbyopia Noise-induced hearing loss Refer back to permanent threshold shifts
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Loud or continuous noises damage hair cells Can be specific area or widespread Damage can be sudden or cumulative e.g. Steven Sills, Pete Townsend – partially deaf Acoustic trauma e.g. Fire cracker exploded near a student's ear, caused 50 db loss above 3000 Hz, and ringing even 2 years later! Tinnitus (Latin for “tinkling”) Chronic ringing in the ears Very Disturbing! Affects ~36 million Americans! Can be caused by loud noises, food, allergies, drugs, infections Treatment… Not much :( Tinnitus masker – added noise source via hearing-aid type device Meniere’s Disease Disease causes buildup of fluid inside the cochlea and semicircular canals Results in “attacks” of fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo Treatment… Not much :( antibiotics, hearing aids Neural Hearing Loss Tumors or other damage to the auditory nerve or pathway Tumors (“acoustic neuroma”) often benign, can be removed Intracanalicular, cisternal, brainstem compressive, and hydrocephalic Other effects like numbness, twitch, vertigo Treatment Surgical removal, radiation, chemotherapy Drugs (antibiotics) e.g., streptomycin, gentamycin, neomycin, kanamycin Fast-acting, but predictable damage to the hair cells e.g., aspirin, quinine, carbon monoxide, tobacco Note: smoking greater rate of hearing loss Tumors Lesions (damage) Head trauma, meningitis, gunshot wounds “Cortical Deafness” “Auditory agnosia” Poor scores on speech reception threshold (SRT), or word recognition scores (WRS) portions of audiogram Note: auditory tract is quite deep, medial, so trauma-induced hearing loss usually accompanies other loss Measuring Hearing Loss Audiologist
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Otorhinolaryngologist (ENT) Ear exam Medical history Audiogram Pure tone Speech Threshold Psych 3040 2/18/08 Eye Movement
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSYC 3040 taught by Professor Walker during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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class notes midterm 2 - Notes from Class: Midterm II TEST 2...

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