Response 4 - John Xu 9/20/07 A Resistance to Change The...

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John Xu 9/20/07 A Resistance to Change The history of the ENIAC’s invention oftentimes excludes the important role played by women. During World War II, women worked as human computers, primarily focusing on ballistic calculations. As more career choices became available due to the lack of men during wartime, women slowly found their way into fields such as mathematics and engineering, areas which were practically unavailable to them before the war. Yet despite their numerous contributions, why were women not given credit for what was clearly theirs? Here, the obvious social shaping of technology during wartime creates an unwelcome equally powerful and opposite reaction, causing an inflexible society to be changed inadvertently by technology, resulting in the seemingly inexplicable phenomenon of such flagrant negligence on the part of historical reporting. The analysis of the development of the ENIAC is significant in explaining the effects of technological development. Initially, it is obvious that the social shaping of technology is
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Response 4 - John Xu 9/20/07 A Resistance to Change The...

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