Response 6 - John Xu 10/10/07 The relationship between...

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John Xu 10/10/07 The relationship between machines and society during the 1950s compared to current day greatly differs. During the 1950s, computers were still relatively new to society, and thus the idea of a world run by machines seemed to be more revolutionary and perhaps intimidating than it does now. As Berkeley says, “during World War II, tremendous advances were made in machinery for deciphering enemy messages” (184). This shows how computers were necessary for specific tasks, and their development went at a pace far greater than the slow tinkering characteristic of technological determinism. Therefore, the relationship between computers and society during the 1950s consists of a sense of uneasiness and uncertainty about the future, feelings forged from the rapid development of technology due to necessity. Now, with computers being a universal machine in terms of their prevalence, society’s uneasiness with the once intimidating machines has been reduced. As Vonnegut’s novel shows, the idea of a society where work is run entirely by machines
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course S&TS 3551 taught by Professor Ratcliff,j during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Response 6 - John Xu 10/10/07 The relationship between...

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