If you do though you will put your body in parallel

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Unformatted text preview: hints on measuring resistance: • Never try to measure resistance in energized circuits (ones with the power on). You won't get an accurate value and you could damage your multimeter or the circuit. Your multimeter probes probably don't fit into the breadboard holes. Stick the stripped end of a wire into each hole, and touch the other stripped ends of the wires with the multimeter probes. If you have clips at the end of your multimeter leads, or you bought those optional alligator clips, you can clip on to the ends of the wires and move the wires from hole to hole. Resistor leads also work for this purpose, but make sure you are not measuring the resistor resistance as well as the breadboard resistance! Because the multimeter uses a low voltage to measure resistance, you can safely use your fingers to press the wires to the multimeter probes to be sure you have a good contact. If you do, though, you will put your body in parallel with the resistance you are measuring. This can be important for certain large values of resistance, those near or greater than your body resistance. It's usually not a problem for continuity checks. Procedure 1 Continuity Check (5 points) To find out if any two holes are connected, measure the resistance between them with the multimeter. This is called a continuity check. Set up • • Have your multimeter and breadboard ready. Set your multimeter on resistance. Measurements and Questions: 1. a (2 points) • • • Measure and record the resistance between two holes in a row of 5 connected holes. Measure and record the resistance between two holes at the opposite ends of a long side row (+ or  ­). Explain the difference (or lack thereof). 1. b (2 points) • What resistan...
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