Civil Rights and Civil Liberties GOV 140.docx - 1 Civil...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

1 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Lesley Garcia College Name, Grand Canyon University Course Number: GOV 140 Professor Blackley Sunday October 18, 2020
2 Case Information Generations now have the luxury of obtaining equal rights and liberty. Civil liberties that the government should not infringe without due process, whether by statute or by legal interpretation. Just a few of the civil liberties that U.S. people enjoy to this day are rights to free expression, confidentiality, fair court hearing, and unlawful search and seizure of an individual's residence. Many people, nevertheless, had to appeal in higher courts in order to gain these freedoms. This was the event of Brown v. Board of Education, where a party of African American students were racially divided and rejected admission into an all-white high school. The decision of Brown v. Board of Education extended and secured equal rights and freedoms for the U.S. citizens. Individuals and Groups Involved Numerous rural white residents and students have been adapted to keeping key public facilities as their proprietary domain for generations, since the 1950s. Black Southern people, on the other hand, have been subjected to certain standards of abuse and bigotry. Before the Brown v. Board of Education trial, in 1896, the U.S. In Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court ruled that racially divided public institutions were lawful if the services were "separate but equal." Laws authorizing segregated buses, bathrooms, classrooms, public buildings, etc. were legally allowed by the ruling. The black public areas, though, were in poorer situations than the white public facilities, so they were not comparable at all. By the early 1950s, by initiating litigation on behalf

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture