LIS4414 Week 2 Forum 2.docx - 1 Answer discussion...

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1. Answer discussion questions #32 and #38 in Quinn pg. 100. Most Ethical theories agree on a large number of moral guidelines. For example, it is nearly universally held that it is wrong to steal. What difference, then, does it make whether someone subscribes to the divine command theory, Kantianism, utilitarianism, or one of the other ethical theories? I would say the biggest difference between many of the moral theories is how the individual feels about their action and what ultimately made them decide to go through with that action. The outcomes may be the same, but the motivation behind it is not. For example, act utilitarianism is driven by creating happiness, whereas for ethical egoism, the decision is driven by how the action will benefit ones self. Can moral decisions be made on a completely codifies, algorithmic basis, or are there fundamental weaknesses to this approach to moral decision making? I believe that moral decisions could not be made on a codified,

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