14_Phenology.pdf - National Aeronautics and Space Administration Tracking Vegetation Phenology with Remote Sensing Amber McCullum and Juan Torres-P\u00e9rez

14_Phenology.pdf - National Aeronautics and Space...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration Amber McCullum and Juan Torres-Pérez June 30 – July 14, 2020 Tracking Vegetation Phenology with Remote Sensing
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5 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Learning Objectives By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Identify how remote sensing can be used to study phenology Recall the satellites and sensors that can be used to estimate land surface parameters Identify various NASA products for phenology Access remote sensing data via portals and webtools
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Phenology Overview
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7 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Phenology The study of plant and animal life cycles in relation to the seasons. The science of appearance Timing of specific biological events Sensitive to environmental conditions Seasonal changes include variations in day length, temperature, and precipitation. How do plants and animals respond? Seasonal cycle of a tree, Image Credit: USGS/NPN)
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8 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Phenology: A Brief History One of the oldest branches of environmental science Originates from the Greek word phaino - to show and bring to light Many cultural references to seasonal changes Swedish botanist, Carolus Linnaeus, systematically recorded the flowering times of plants and the associated climate conditions. British landowner, Robert Marsham, kept phenological records on his estate. Flowering, bud burst, emergence of insects Thesis of Linnaeus, Pollination depicted in Praeludia Sponsaliorum Plantarum (1729). Image Credit: Digital Commons
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9 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Phenology: Ecological Importance Phenological events change from year to year. Timing of events (phenophase) such as flowering, leafing, migration, and insect emergence can impact how plants and animals are able to thrive in their environment. Influences abundance and distribution of organisms, ecosystems services, and global cycles of water and carbon.
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10 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Phenology: Ecological Importance These processes are sensitive to climate change. Earlier spring, later fall Not all species changing at same rate or direction Trends in lilac and honeysuckle first bloom dates across the contiguous 48 states. This map compares the average first bloom date for two 10-year periods. Image Credit: Schwartz, 2016
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11 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Drivers of Phenology Annual average temperatures in the contiguous 48 states from 1901-2016. Image Credit: NOAA, 2016 . Spring temperature change from 1970- 2014, based on rate of change from 1970. Image Credit: Climate Central. Temperature
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12 NASA’s Applied Remote Sensing Training Program Drivers of Phenology Total annual precipitation anomaly in the contiguous U.S. from 1901. Image Credit: NOAA, 2016 .
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