Final Exam Study Guide - Poems Stopping Woods p 803 Robert Frost Tetrameter four nearly identical stanzas Looking back compared to The Snow Man He

Final Exam Study Guide - Poems Stopping Woods p 803 Robert...

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Poems:Stopping Woods - p. 803Robert FrostTetrameter, four nearly identical stanzasLooking back compared to “The Snow Man”He thinks he knows who owns the woods > Stops by woods > no one will find him there > watches scenery > wants to stay longer but knows he cant > has a long way to go before he can restWoods are a metaphor for the afterlife and how easy it would be to just stay there forever, but he has promises to keepThe last two lines are the same because he knows that he will live his life with the same routine until death relieves himThe Snow Man - p. 816Wallace StevensFree verse, five tercetsLooking forward compared to stopping woodsThe poem is one long complex sentenceNo rhyme or particular meterWallace describes the difference between the human view and the view of a nonliving object Humans inability to see the world around them without passing judgment or thinking of human conditionsMy Papa's Waltz - p. 955Theodore roethketrimeterRomp: to play or frolicThe title is an oxymoron (Papa is informal and waltz is formal)the fact that the papa has been drinking combined with his clumsy waltzing makes the small boy dizzy > they waltz lead to causing the pans to fall off the shelf and the mother disapproves which is shown with a frown > the father has an injured knuckle > every time his papa misses a step the boy’s ear scrapes his belt buckle > his papa “beats time on [his] head” > his palm is caked hard by dirt > his papa waltzed him off to bed, still clinging to his shirt“I hung on like death” and still clinging to your shirt”oPossible that the father’s death is foreshadowed and the son is unwilling to let the father goThose Winter Sundays - p. 968
Robert HaydenAustere: strict, disciplinedFree verseFather gets up early on Sundays as well > puts on his cloths and starts a fire with hands that ached from labor during the weekday > no one ever thanked him > the young person wakes up and can hear the cold splintering > the father would wait until the house/rooms were warm to call > the young person would rise and dress fearing the chronic angers of that house > he would speak indifferently to the father who drove out the cold and also polished his shoes > ends with “what did I know, what did I know of love’s austere and lonely offices?”Instead of feeling guilty for not appreciating his father, he ends by saying that he didn’t know any betterWhen I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer - p. 689Walt WhitmanSingle stanza, eight lines, free verseHes listening to the astronomer > looking at proofs figures, charts diagrams > shown how to add divide and measure > the astronomer lectured with applause in the lecture room (signifies hes a good lecturer) > he doesn’t know how but he became tired and sick > until he wandered off by himself in the mystical moist night air and looked up in perfect silence at the stars

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