Liberty PADM 501 DB6.docx - Based on the American...

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Based on the American “constitution,” which internal and external stakeholders, in the policy making process, possess “constitutional legitimacy” for their role in making public policy? Do entities with explicit power have more influence than those entities with implied powers in making public policy? Should they? Why or why not? Constitutional legitimacy is a virtue rooted in a system of belief: the acceptance that an exercise in power is justified and therefore authorized, either implicitly or explicitly, by society at large. The concept of legitimacy must be distinguished from the concept of legality; an illegal action may be legitimate in the eyes of the people, and conversely, simply because an action is legal does not always imply that it is legitimate. ("Constitutional legitimacy: An analysis under Max Weber's traditional sources of authority by Brian Chau :: SSRN," n.d.). Stakeholders are defined as that is, individuals and groups with a common interest in the consequences of administrative action. (Milakovich & Gordon, 2013, p. 11). Internal stakeholders in a business context are the individuals or parties that are directly involved in the management of the business. These stakeholders have a vested interest in the business and hence, they can directly affect or be affected by the successes or failures experienced by the business. In the case of public policy, let us consider the

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