alittlebitofcalculus-pdf-january2011-111112001007-phpapp01

Instantaneous so fx d fx the ar ea function fx

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Unformatted text preview: 1 + . . . + f( -x n -- 1)( δ x n -- 1) = n →∞ Σ f( -- i ) . δ x i x i=0 As n gets larger and larger we can see that the sum is a better and better approximation of the area function F(x). 3. LIMIT step : continuous summation of UNCOUNTABLY many terms. step continuous summation contin We can denote δ x i by dx when we take the LIMIT of the sum as n → ∞. -F(x) = Limit Σ f (x i ) . dx for i = 0, 1, 2, . . . , n → ∞ . L imit n →∞ b F(x) = Limit Σ f ( -- i ) . dx = ∫ f (x). dx . x L imit a i=0 F(x) = continuous summa tion o f f(x i) dx over interval [a, b]. continuous summation contin Note: We should be careful when we say “ that in the interval [ a, x1] there is some MEAN point -x 0 . . . ”. This may NOT always be the case. Let the set S = ( 3, 4, 5, 7 ). For the elements 3 and 5 there is the element 4 in s, such that 4 is the MEAN of 3 and 5. i.e. 4 = 3 + 5 . However, there is no element 6 in s a s the MEAN of 5 and 7. 2 6 = 5 + 7 is not an element of s. 2 Since we are dealing only with CONTINUOUS functions we can say “ that in the inter val [a, x 1 ] there is some MEAN point -x 0 . . . ”. For example, for f(x) = x 2 : f (2) = 4, and f(4) = 16 . The mean of f(2) and f(4) is = f ( 2 ) + f ( 4 ) = 4 + 16 = 10 . 2 2 -x = √10 in the interval [2, 4 ] such that f(-x ) = 10 . There is some MEAN point 134 It should now be clear that whichever method you choose (rectangular, Limit trapezoidal, . . . ) the n → ∞ F n(x) is the same and is the area function “area F(x) of the “area under the cur v e ” f (x) over the inter val [a,b]. “ar The area function F(x) = ∫ f(x)dx. Since we know the inter val over which we are finding the area we could be more DEFINITE and use the (Fourier refinement of Leibniz) notation: b [ F(x) ]b = ∫ f (x)dx a a With the understanding that F(x) = the area under f(x) = ∫ f(x)dx the reader may wish to review the chapter on Units of Measure . Units So far we have only a notation for the area function : F(x) = ∫ f(x)dx We do NOT know what F(x) is, much less even begin to evaluate it. What is the area function F(x) ? Is there a relationship between f(x) and F(x) ? We claim...
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2012 for the course PHYSICS 105 taught by Professor Tamerdoğan during the Fall '09 term at Middle East Technical University.

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