Close Reading-Palumbo - Palumbo 1 Audrey Palumbo Emily Datskou Engl 273 Close Reading The opening of chapter II of Jane Eyre begins with the

Close Reading-Palumbo - Palumbo 1 Audrey Palumbo Emily...

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Palumbo 1 Audrey Palumbo Emily Datskou Engl 273 9/18/20 Close Reading The opening of chapter II of Jane Eyre begins with the passage “I resisted all the way: a new thing for me, and a circumstance which greatly strengthened the bad opinion Bessie and Miss Abbot were disposed to entertain of me. The fact is, I was a trifle beside myself; or rather out of myself, as the French would say: I was conscious that a moment’s mutiny had already rendered me liable to strange penalties, and, like any other rebel slave, I felt resolved, in my desperation, to go all lengths” (Bronte 7). This paragraph gives readers a deeper insight into Jane’s mind and firmly develops her character as a person who is not passive under duress. She is being taken into the red room, a prison of sorts for her and also the room where Mr. Reed died, which gives it a cold and solemn aura. In this one paragraph, we immediately see Jane as a both a contrast to what is typically thought of as a gothic woman, and also a perfect fit to the trope. One of the characteristics of a gothic woman is someone who is struggling mainly internally. She does not make her strong feelings known, but rather has an outwards appearance of meek sadness and struggle. The “damsel in distress” often refers to a woman who is powerless

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