Expos.WritinginCollege - WritinginCollege...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 6 pages.

“Writing in College” by Joseph M. Williams and Lawrence McEnerney, University of Chicago From high school to college Some students make very smooth transitions from writing in high school to writing in college, and we heartily wish all of  you an easy passage. But other students are puzzled and frustrated by their experiences in writing for college classes. Only  months earlier your writing was winning praise; now your instructors are dissatisfied, saying that the writing isn't quite  "there" yet, saying that the writing is "lacking something." You haven't changed--your writing is still mechanically sound,  your descriptions are accurate, you're saying smart things. But they're still not happy. Some of the criticism is easy to  understand: it's easy to predict that standards at college are going to be higher than in high school. But it is not just a matter  of higher standards: Often, what your instructors are asking of you is not just something  better , but something  different . If  that's the case, then you won't succeed merely by being more intelligent or more skillful at doing what you did in high  school. Instead, you'll need to direct your skills and your intelligence to a new task. We should note here that a college is a big place and that you'll be asked to use writing to fulfill different tasks. You'll find  occasions where you'll succeed by summarizing a reading accurately and showing that you understand it. There may be  times when you're invited to use writing to react to a reading, speculate about it. Far more often--like every other week-- you will be asked to  analyze  the reading, to make a worthwhile  claim  about it that is not obvious ( state a thesis  means  almost the same thing), to support your claim with good reasons, all in four or five pages that are organized to present an  argument  . (If you did that in high school, write your teachers a letter of gratitude.) Argument: a key feature of college writing Now by "argument" we do not mean a dispute over a loud stereo. In college, an argument is something less contentious and  more systematic: It is a set of statements coherently arranged to offer three things that experienced readers expect in essays  that they judge to be thoughtful: • They expect to see a  claim  that would encourage them to say, "That's interesting. I'd like to know  more."  • They expect to see  evidence, reasons  for your claim, evidence that would encourage them to agree with  your claim, or at least to think it plausible.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture