week 4 questions.docx - Describe the spectrum of death and...

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Describe the spectrum of death and dying rituals and practices across cultures. Why are death and dying rituals so significant? o Throughout history, the human species has had to deal with the reality of death. Over the years we have developed rites and rituals to help in the passing of life to honor the person who is dying or has died or in some way (Gordon, 2015, para. 3). Death and grief are normal life events and all cultures have developed ways to cope with death in a respectful manner. Interfering with these practices can disrupt people’s ability to cope during the grieving process. There is a strong focus on religion because religion can be thought of as a cultural system of meaning that helps to solve problems of uncertainty, powerlessness, and absence that death creates. o Every culture has their unique way to handle death and dying. For example, Hindus believe in reincarnation. When a person dies their soul merely moves from one body to the next on its path to reach Heaven. So, while it is a sad time when someone dies, it is also a time of celebration. Family and a priest may come to pray with the dying person, sing holy songs and read holy texts. o The five stages, denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with the one we lost. They are tools to help us frame and identify what we may be feeling. But they are not stops on some linear timeline in grief. They can occur in any order and may occur more than once until the final stage of acceptance. Denial At first, the patient reacts with denial. This may initially manifest as shock or speechlessness. It is common to believe a mistake in the prognosis has been made due to inaccurate test results, having not attempted the correct treatment, or deficits in knowledge of their provider. Some patients may exist in an alternate reality. They may tell loved ones, who are already aware of their prognosis, “We will go on a vacation as soon as I’m better." Anger The patient moves to the second phase when they are no longer able to deny their imminent death. They become frustrated and angry. They typically direct their aggression toward friends,

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