WK7AssgnNewmanT.docx - 1 Group Processes and Stages of...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 7 pages.

1 Group Processes and Stages of Formation Tracy Newman Masters in Nursing, Walden University NRNP 6650A-1 Psychotherapy with Groups and Families Dr. Timothy Legg October 17, 2020
2 Group Processes and Stages of Formation To assess an individual's appropriateness for group therapy, the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) should consider group processes and stages of formation. This paper will discuss group processes, stages of formation, and curative factors within the group, as illustrated in the video. It will also highlight intragroup conflict and propose conflict management techniques. Group Process Group process refers to how individuals work together to get things done (Stone & Kwan 2016). Typically, groups spend a lot of time and energy goal setting and working to achieve those goals but give little thought to what is happening amongst the group's most significant resource, the members (Stone & Kwan 2016). People are individuals pursuing their own personal, private interests, but they are also social collectives that tie members together (Stone & Kwan 2016). According to (Stone and Kwan (2016), t he processes within these groups profoundly affect their members and society-at-large. Just as the dynamic processes that occur in groups such as sharing information among members, leading and following, placing pressure on members to adhere to the group's expectations, shifting friendship affiliations, and conflict and collaboration change the group, so do they change the group's members (Stone & Kwan 2016). To be successful, groups must be able to work together, contributing as a group toward results. But this does not happen automatically: it evolves as the group works collectively together. Stages of Formation The process of learning to work together effectively is known as team development, according to Seck and Helton (2014). Research has shown teams go through categorical stages of growth. Bruce Tuckman, an educational psychologist, described a five-stage development model
3 that most teams follow to become successful. He called the stages: forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. Seck and Helton (2014) note the forming stage involves a period of orientation and acquaintance. During this stage, uncertainty is high, and individuals seek leadership and authority. At this point, individual roles and responsibilities are unclear, and interactions are social as individuals become acquainted (Seck & Helton, 2014). According to Seck and Helton

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture