4.1 v1 Sparse Vector and Matrix Algebra

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Unformatted text preview: 0 1.0 5.0 6.0 2.0 8.0 3.0 7.0 9.0 10.0 4.0 RAIndx(k): 1 1 2 2 4 4 2 2 1 1 3 3 4 4 11 33 44 ERPA(K): 0 3 3 5 5 7 7 10 10 B(k): RBIndx(k): ERPB(K): Switch(k): RCIndx(k): ERPC(K): 0 0 12 12 2.0 7.0 11.0 23.0 14.0 5.0 16.0 7.0 88.0 2.0 7.0 11.0 23.0 14.0 5.0 16.0 7.0 88.0 1 1 2 2 3 4 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 4 3 3 13 34 4 3 3 5 5 7 7 9 9 3 2 1 0 4 1 1 4 3 4 2 1 0 2 2 2 6 6 3 1 0 4 4 4 9 8 9 3 1 0 4 3 3 12 2 2 1 1 3 3 44 11 1 3 4 © Copyright 1999 Daniel Tylavsky Sparse Vector & Matrix Algebra Initialize: Switch=0, IR=0 Clear C(k) from 1 to N IR=IR+1 Use Switch array to point to where each col. is stored in C(k). Add A and B to appropriate locations in C from ERPA/B(IR-1)+1 to ERPA(IR). N IR=N? Y End © Copyright 1999 Daniel Tylavsky Sparse Vector & Matrix Algebra The “R*Indx” arrays should read “C*Indx” arrays to represent column indices. You can show that the arrays at completion have the form: Pos: A(k): RAIndx(k): ERPA(K): B(k): RBIndx(k): ERPB(K): Switch(k): RCIndx(k): ERPC(K): C(k): IR: 0 0 1 1.0 1 3 2 5.0 2 5 0 2.0 1 3 7.0 11.0 23.0 14.0 5.0 16.0 7.0 88.0 2 3 2 1 1 3 3 4 5 7 9 0 4 2 1 0 3 6.0 4 7...
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