Hamilton The Revolution by Lin-Manuel Miranda Jeremy McCarter (z-lib.org).pdf

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Unformatted text preview: TH E R E V O L U T I O N TH E R E V O L U T I O N TH E R E V O L U T I O N B e i n g T h e C o m p l e t e o f t h e B ro a d w a y w i t h I t s a n d a L i b r e tt o t r u e M u s i c a l, a c c o u n t o f Cre a tion , c o n c i s e r e m a r k s o n H i p - H o p , the Po w er o f Storie s , a n d the N e w Ameri c a b y L in - M a nuel M ir a n d a a n d J erem y M c C a rter TH E R E V O L U T I O N B e i n g T h e C o m p l e t e o f t h e B ro a d w a y w i t h I t s a n d a L i b r e tt o t r u e M u s i c a l, a c c o u n t o f Cre a tion , c o n c i s e r e m a r k s o n H i p - H o p , the Po w er o f Storie s , a n d the N e w Ameri c a b y L in - M a nuel M ir a n d a a n d J erem y M c C a rter Copyright © 2016 by Lin-Manuel Miranda Cover and interior design by Paul Kepple and Max Vandenberg at Headcase design Pages 286–288 constitute an extension of the copyright page. All rights reserved. In accordance with the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, the scanning, uploading, and electronic sharing of any part of this book without the permission of the publisher constitute unlawful piracy and theft of the author’s intellectual property. If you would like to use material from the book (other than for review purposes), prior written permission must be obtained by contacting the publisher at [email protected] Thank you for your support of the author’s rights. Th is b o o k is d e d ica t e d t o sebastian grand central PublisHing Hachette Book Group 1290 Avenue of the Americas • New York, NY 10104 grandcentralpublishing.com • twitter.com/grandcentralpub First Edition: April 2016 Grand Central Publishing is a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc. The Grand Central Publishing name and logo is a trademark of HacHette book grouP, inc. The publisher is not responsible for websites (or their content) that are not owned by the publisher. The Hachette Speakers Bureau provides a wide range of authors for speaking events. To find out more, go to or call (866) 376-6591. This book was produced by MelcHer Media. PCN: 2015957946 ISBNs: 978-1-4555-3974-1 (hardcover), 978-1-4555-6753-9 (ebook) E3 and sloane, who will come of age with our young nation. — L. M . M . & J . M . Copyright © 2016 by Lin-Manuel Miranda Cover and interior design by Paul Kepple and Max Vandenberg at Headcase design Pages 286–288 constitute an extension of the copyright page. All rights reserved. In accordance with the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, the scanning, uploading, and electronic sharing of any part of this book without the permission of the publisher constitute unlawful piracy and theft of the author’s intellectual property. If you would like to use material from the book (other than for review purposes), prior written permission must be obtained by contacting the publisher at [email protected] Thank you for your support of the author’s rights. Th is b o o k is d e d ica t e d t o sebastian grand central PublisHing Hachette Book Group 1290 Avenue of the Americas • New York, NY 10104 grandcentralpublishing.com • twitter.com/grandcentralpub First Edition: April 2016 Grand Central Publishing is a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc. The Grand Central Publishing name and logo is a trademark of HacHette book grouP, inc. The publisher is not responsible for websites (or their content) that are not owned by the publisher. The Hachette Speakers Bureau provides a wide range of authors for speaking events. To find out more, go to or call (866) 376-6591. This book was produced by MelcHer Media. PCN: 2015957946 ISBNs: 978-1-4555-3974-1 (hardcover), 978-1-4555-6753-9 (ebook) E3 and sloane, who will come of age with our young nation. — L. M . M . & J . M . Chapter T A B LE o f C ON T EN T S VII 58 On the Character of George Washington and the Character of Chris Jackson “right hand man”. . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Chapter i n t r o d u c t i o n , or p l a n o f t h e w o r k a c t . . . . . . VIII “a winter’s ball” . . . . . . . . . . . . “ h e lp l e s s ” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I me inside”. Chapter Chapter I 14 h a m i l t o n ” .. . . . . . . . . 38 In Which the Character of New York City Is Considered in Its Musical and Scenic Aspects, by Reference to David Korins and a Curious Episode of Historical Vertigo On the Origins of Revolution, Both National & Musical, with Reference to Opening Numbers & White House Raps “alexander Chapter IV 70 16 “the schuyler sisters”. . . . . . . . . “that “aaron burr, sir”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . “my shot”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter Chapter 23 26 78 80 story of tonight”. refuted”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 for it”. . VI 52 On the Orchestrating Techniques of Alex Lacamoire, with Lively Appearances by Van Halen, Elmo, and an Actual Beatle “you’ll b e b a c k ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . X 88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 49 Chapter Chapter 110 XIV 112 On Paul Tazewell and the Fashion of Revolution “ g u n s a n d s h i p s ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . “ h i s t o r y h a s i t s e y e s o n y o u ” .. . . . “ y o r k t o w n ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 120 12 1 86 The Same Subject Continued, with Allusion to Leslie Odom, Jr., Plus Remarks on the Virtues and Merits of Union “ wa i t 32 Giving the History of Ron Chernow, Along with Remarks on Who May Play a Founding Father “the 46 Stakes Is High; Or, What Happened at Lincoln Center and What Came After, Including Lunch with Jeffrey Seller “ fa r m e r Chapter III V . . . . . . . 42 20 In Which Tommy Kail Is Introduced, and His Adventures with Lin Surveyed 107 w o u ld b e e n o u g h ” . Chapter Chapter II XIII 71 On the Perfect Union of Actor and Role, with Allusion to Renée Elise Goldsberry “ s a t i s f i e d ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “the story of tonight” (reprise) . . . 104 On Phillipa Soo and the Trouble with Goodness Chapter Chapter IX . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Concerning The Lady and the Tramp, in Olden Days and Our Own, with Reference to “Helpless” and Many Songs That Feature Ja Rule 10 102 Of Oskar Eustis, His Politics, His Eventful Career, His Thoughts on Verse Drama, and His Stewardship of The Public Theater, with a Word About The Pharcyde “meet Chapter XII 57 XI 12 4 By Which It Will Appear That Good History Makes Good Drama, and in Which Sebastian Miranda Makes His Debut “what comes next?”. . . . . . . . . . . “ d e a r t h e o d o s i a ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . “ t o m o r r o w t h e r e ’ l l b e m o r e o f u s ” .. 127 12 8 130 94 Chapter Wherein Mobb Deep Is Sampled, and the Immortal Biggie Smalls Is Revived “ s ta y a l i v e ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “ten duel commandments”. . . . . . XV 96 99 XVI 132 On “Non-Stop,” Both the Song and the Way of Life, as Manifest by Andy Blankenbuehler and The Public Theater’s Props Department “non-stop”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Chapter T A B LE o f C ON T EN T S VII 58 On the Character of George Washington and the Character of Chris Jackson “right hand man”. . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Chapter i n t r o d u c t i o n , or p l a n o f t h e w o r k a c t . . . . . . VIII “a winter’s ball” . . . . . . . . . . . . “ h e lp l e s s ” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I me inside”. Chapter Chapter I 14 h a m i l t o n ” .. . . . . . . . . 38 In Which the Character of New York City Is Considered in Its Musical and Scenic Aspects, by Reference to David Korins and a Curious Episode of Historical Vertigo On the Origins of Revolution, Both National & Musical, with Reference to Opening Numbers & White House Raps “alexander Chapter IV 70 16 “the schuyler sisters”. . . . . . . . . “that “aaron burr, sir”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . “my shot”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter Chapter 23 26 78 80 story of tonight”. refuted”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 for it”. . VI 52 On the Orchestrating Techniques of Alex Lacamoire, with Lively Appearances by Van Halen, Elmo, and an Actual Beatle “you’ll b e b a c k ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . X 88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 49 Chapter Chapter 110 XIV 112 On Paul Tazewell and the Fashion of Revolution “ g u n s a n d s h i p s ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . “ h i s t o r y h a s i t s e y e s o n y o u ” .. . . . “ y o r k t o w n ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 120 12 1 86 The Same Subject Continued, with Allusion to Leslie Odom, Jr., Plus Remarks on the Virtues and Merits of Union “ wa i t 32 Giving the History of Ron Chernow, Along with Remarks on Who May Play a Founding Father “the 46 Stakes Is High; Or, What Happened at Lincoln Center and What Came After, Including Lunch with Jeffrey Seller “ fa r m e r Chapter III V . . . . . . . 42 20 In Which Tommy Kail Is Introduced, and His Adventures with Lin Surveyed 107 w o u ld b e e n o u g h ” . Chapter Chapter II XIII 71 On the Perfect Union of Actor and Role, with Allusion to Renée Elise Goldsberry “ s a t i s f i e d ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “the story of tonight” (reprise) . . . 104 On Phillipa Soo and the Trouble with Goodness Chapter Chapter IX . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Concerning The Lady and the Tramp, in Olden Days and Our Own, with Reference to “Helpless” and Many Songs That Feature Ja Rule 10 102 Of Oskar Eustis, His Politics, His Eventful Career, His Thoughts on Verse Drama, and His Stewardship of The Public Theater, with a Word About The Pharcyde “meet Chapter XII 57 XI 12 4 By Which It Will Appear That Good History Makes Good Drama, and in Which Sebastian Miranda Makes His Debut “what comes next?”. . . . . . . . . . . “ d e a r t h e o d o s i a ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . “ t o m o r r o w t h e r e ’ l l b e m o r e o f u s ” .. 127 12 8 130 94 Chapter Wherein Mobb Deep Is Sampled, and the Immortal Biggie Smalls Is Revived “ s ta y a l i v e ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “ten duel commandments”. . . . . . XV 96 99 XVI 132 On “Non-Stop,” Both the Song and the Way of Life, as Manifest by Andy Blankenbuehler and The Public Theater’s Props Department “non-stop”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 a Chapter XVII c 14 8 In New York You Can Be a New Man, Or, The Story of Oak and Daveed “what’d i m i s s ? ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . t II Chapter “the room where it happens” . . . . “schuyler defeated”. . . . . . . . . . “cabinet battle #2” . . . . . . . . . . XVIII 156 An Account of Rapping for the Children, Who Will One Day Rap for Themselves “cabinet # 1 ” .. . . . . . . . . . battle XXII “ wa s h i n g t o n o n y o u r s i d e ” .. XIX Did They or Didn’t They? Or, Some Discourse on Affairs “ ta k e a break”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 161 164 XXIII 205 On the Origin and Persistence of Our National Shame “one l a s t t i m e ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 In Which Advantages Are Derived from Listening to the Broadway Old Masters and Jasmine Cephas Jones “say n o t o t h i s ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . XXIV know him”. “we know” . . . . . . . . . . . “ h u r r i c a n e ” .. . . . . . . . . “ t h e r e y n o l d s pa m p h l e t ” “burn”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . “your “best Chapter 180 On Being in “The Room Where It Happens” with the Cast of A Chorus Line—Plus a Brief Account of Nevin Steinberg Bringing Boom-Bap to Broadway with Speakers the Size of Refrigerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 18 XXV 222 On Killing Your Darlings, with Reference to “The Adams Administration,” the Seductions of Ben Franklin, and Songs on the Cutting-Room Floor “the adams administration” . . . . ( f u l l ly r i c s ) XXVII “ b l o w u s a l l a wa y ” . . . . . . . . . . . “ s ta y a l i v e ” ( r e p r i s e ) . . . . . . . . . . 22 9 232 234 o b e d i e n t s e r va n t ” . . . . . . . 2 66 b e s t o f w o m e n ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 69 Chapter XXXI 270 of wives and 238 2 40 w o r l d wa s w i d e e n o u g h ” .. . . . 272 2 45 2 48 XXVIII quiet uptown”. How the Duel Was Fought, and Rewritten, and Fought Again, as the Clock Ran Out “the 250 A Grieving Chapter: On Losses Beyond Words Chapter 176 Chapter XXI . . .. . Giving an Account of a Hurricane, with a Notable Appearance by President Obama, and the Remarkable Rise of Anthony Ramos . . . . . . . . . . 253 22 4 XXIX Chapter XXXII 276 What Is a Legacy? Or, a Sketch of Opening Night, and What Came After, and What Might Come Next “who lives, who dies, w h o t e l l s y o u r s t o r y ” .. . . . . . . . . 2 80 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 84 256 Containing a Dialogue on Ambition, and Some Topical Comments, from David Brooks and Christopher Hayes “the Chapter 2 63 2 14 Of Jonathan Groff, His Royal Character, His Notable Career, His Dressing Room Décor &C. “i XXX Further Thoughts on Ambition, as It Pertains to the Playwright and the Enigmatic Burr Chapter 209 168 Chapter XX Chapter In Which the Hero Blows Up His Spot, with the Assistance of Howell Binkley’s Lights and Other Forms of Ingenious Stagecraft “it’s Chapter 225 196 A Picture of the Recording Studio, Featuring Learned Comments by Questlove and a Thrown Shoe Chapter Chapter 191 192 152 Chapter Chapter 186 XXVI election of 1800”. . . . . . . . . e p i l o g u e credits & acknowledgments. 258 . . 2 86 a Chapter XVII c 14 8 In New York You Can Be a New Man, Or, The Story of Oak and Daveed “what’d i m i s s ? ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . t II Chapter “the room where it happens” . . . . “schuyler defeated”. . . . . . . . . . “cabinet battle #2” . . . . . . . . . . XVIII 156 An Account of Rapping for the Children, Who Will One Day Rap for Themselves “cabinet # 1 ” .. . . . . . . . . . battle XXII “ wa s h i n g t o n o n y o u r s i d e ” .. XIX Did They or Didn’t They? Or, Some Discourse on Affairs “ ta k e a break”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 161 164 XXIII 205 On the Origin and Persistence of Our National Shame “one l a s t t i m e ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 In Which Advantages Are Derived from Listening to the Broadway Old Masters and Jasmine Cephas Jones “say n o t o t h i s ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . XXIV know him”. “we know” . . . . . . . . . . . “ h u r r i c a n e ” .. . . . . . . . . “ t h e r e y n o l d s pa m p h l e t ” “burn”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . “your “best Chapter 180 On Being in “The Room Where It Happens” with the Cast of A Chorus Line—Plus a Brief Account of Nevin Steinberg Bringing Boom-Bap to Broadway with Speakers the Size of Refrigerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 18 XXV 222 On Killing Your Darlings, with Reference to “The Adams Administration,” the Seductions of Ben Franklin, and Songs on the Cutting-Room Floor “the adams administration” . . . . ( f u l l ly r i c s ) XXVII “ b l o w u s a l l a wa y ” . . . . . . . . . . . “ s ta y a l i v e ” ( r e p r i s e ) . . . . . . . . . . 22 9 232 234 o b e d i e n t s e r va n t ” . . . . . . . 2 66 b e s t o f w o m e n ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 69 Chapter XXXI 270 of wives and 238 2 40 w o r l d wa s w i d e e n o u g h ” .. . . . 272 2 45 2 48 XXVIII quiet uptown”. How the Duel Was Fought, and Rewritten, and Fought Again, as the Clock Ran Out “the 250 A Grieving Chapter: On Losses Beyond Words Chapter 176 Chapter XXI . . .. . Giving an Account of a Hurricane, with a Notable Appearance by President Obama, and the Remarkable Rise of Anthony Ramos . . . . . . . . . . 253 22 4 XXIX Chapter XXXII 276 What Is a Legacy? Or, a Sketch of Opening Night, and What Came After, and What Might Come Next “who lives, who dies, w h o t e l l s y o u r s t o r y ” .. . . . . . . . . 2 80 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 84 256 Containing a Dialogue on Ambition, and Some Topical Comments, from David Brooks and Christopher Hayes “the Chapter 2 63 2 14 Of Jonathan Groff, His Royal Character, His Notable Career, His Dressing Room Décor &C. “i XXX Further Thoughts on Ambition, as It Pertains to the Playwright and the Enigmatic Burr Chapter 209 168 Chapter XX Chapter In Which the Hero Blows Up His Spot, with the Assistance of Howell Binkley’s Lights and Other Forms of Ingenious Stagecraft “it’s Chapter 225 196 A Picture of the Recording Studio, Featuring Learned Comments by Questlove and a Thrown Shoe Chapter Chapter 191 192 152 Chapter Chapter 186 XXVI election of 1800”. . . . . . . . . e p i l o g u e credits & acknowledgments. 258 . . 2 86 i n t r o d u ct i o n INTRODUCTION O R L P L A N O F ate on a hazy night in 2008, T H E W O R K using hip-hop to tell a story that had nothing to do with hip-hop—using it as form, not content. Lin thought my review grasped what he had been trying to do. The show’s publicist fixed us up. Hence the late-night drinks and the long talk about which of our favorite MCs should play Thomas Jefferson. In the summer of 2011, after I’d left the magazine business and joined the artistic staff of the Public Theater, my boss, Oskar Eustis, asked me to propose some artists and projects. The first artist who came to mind was Lin, and the first project was his Hamilton idea. Lin and Oskar agreed to meet; Lin sent us demos; we went to Lin’s concerts. Two years later, Oskar and Jeffrey Seller—the lead producer of what had by now ceased to be an album and had turned into a stage musical—agreed to develop the show at the Public. The opening night party there— another late, hazy conversation—is when Lin proposed that I write this book. It tells the stories of two revolutions. There’s the American Revolution of the 18th century, which flares to life in Lin’s libretto, the complete text of which is published here, with his annotations. There’s also the revolution of the show itself: a musical that changes the way that Broadway sounds, that alters who gets to tell the story of our founding, that lets us glimpse the new, more diverse America rushing our way. The fact that Lin wrote the show largely in sequence means that this book can trace the two revolutions in tandem. The story of the show’s creation begins Lin-Manuel Miranda told me he wanted to write a hip-hop concept album about the life of Alexander Hamilton. For a second I thought we were sharing a drunken joke. We were probably drunk, but he wasn’t joking. We had bonded a year earlier over a shared love of hip-hop and theater, though that evening was the first time we were meeting. When Lin’s first show, In the Heights, had its Off-Broadway premiere in 2007, I was the drama critic at New York magazine, where I had repeatedly argued for the enormous but neglected possibilities of hip-hop in the theater. (“Hip-hop can save the theater”; began one of those essays, “I am not kidding.”) Rap, it seemed to me, wasn’t like rock or jazz or any other kind of pop music: The lyrical density and storytelling ingenuity I heard on my headphones seemed closer to the verbal energy of the great plays of the past than almost anything I saw onstage. This enthusiasm wasn’t widely shared. “Don’t hang back among the brutes,” one of my senior colleagues advised me after reading one such essay, offering an erudite but demoralizing quotation from A Streetcar Named Desire. After many disappointments and false alarms, Heights had made me sit up in my aisle seat: Here’s the guy. Lin’s show about immigrants in Upper Manhattan fused salsa, hip-hop, and traditional Broadway ballads to make something old and new, familiar and surprising. Best of all, he made the leap that virtually nobody else had made, 10 regarded as secret, is that Lin’s uniquely singlehanded at the White House on May 12, 2009, when he performed achievement (as composer, lyricist, librettist, and star) the first song for the first time. It ends with opening night required the artistry of dozens of very gifted people to on Broadway, August 6, 2015, just after he completed the be realized. A bunch of people from a bunch of backfinal scenes of the show. grounds had to come together to make it work, and The account of what happened in the intervening six they did this so well that an even bigger bunch of peoyears is based on what I saw in script meetings, set meetple from yet more backgrounds flocked to see ...
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