Bio 112 Report - Factors affecting the rate of activity in...

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Factors affecting the rate of activity in enzymes. Jakob Solem Des Moines Area Community College Bonne Campus Bio 112 Fall 2007
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INTRODUCTION The objective of this experiment was for us to relate the concept of optimal conditions to enzymatic activity. In doing this, we had to predict how changes in temperature, pH, substrate concentration, and enzyme concentration affect the time it takes to complete the enzymatic reactions. With the results we were able to explain how these conditions alter enzymatic reactions. (Vodopich) A spontaneous chemical reaction occurs without any requirement for outside energy, but by adding a small amount of a catalyst, such as an enzyme it speeds up the process. Without enzymes the metabolism pathways would be congested for a long time. The reactant an enzyme acts on is referred to as the enzyme’s substrate. This means that when the enzyme and the substrate are joined they convert into the product of the reaction, which is enzyme plus the product. Only a certain region of the enzyme actually binds with the substrate and this is called the active site. The active site is a groove on the surface of the protein, and is formed by only a few of the enzymes amino acids. Amylase is an enzyme found in human saliva (Campbell). Amylase attaches itself to the starch molecule to form maltose. Forming maltose starch had to lose a pair of glucose subunit. This whole process is called hydrolysis. METHODS For the first part of the lab was called the general procedure, we started by following the hydrolysis of starch by using iodine; this will turn blue in the presence of starch. We started by labeling 5- 10 circles on a spot plate and matching them to the appropriate time of 2,4,6,8,10…ext. Minutes. We then placed a drop of iodine in each of the spots on the spot plate. Then we used a pipet to place the starch- amylase mixture into the labeled circles that contain the iodine. From there we determined if there was starch present or not. If the liquid turned dark blue then starch was present and the hydrolysis reaction was incomplete. We then did the same thing except instead of putting the amylase in right away we put it in the first spot then waited 2 minutes then placed another drop in the next spot and so on. From there we recorded what we happened. If the color remained the iodine color then we knew that starch had been hydrolyzed.
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The next part of the lab we determined the effect of temperature on hydrolysis. We first poured 20
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BIOLOGY 112 taught by Professor Bergin during the Spring '08 term at Des Moines CC.

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Bio 112 Report - Factors affecting the rate of activity in...

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