The Cartesian Circle and the Problem of the Criterion

The Cartesian Circle and the Problem of the Criterion - The...

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The Cartesian Circle and the Problem of the Criterion “In its generalized form, The Cartesian Circle is none other than the Problem of the Criterion, a problem that epistemology must face.” James Van Cleve “Foundationalism, Epistemic Principles, and the Cartesian Circle” pp. 101-31 in Descartes , ed. By John Cottingham (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998) The Cartesian Circle: Arises from two propositions: 1. I can know (be certain) that (p) whatever I perceive clearly and distinctly is true only if I first know (am certain) that (q) God exists and is not a deceiver. 2. I can know (be certain) that (q) God exists and is not a deceiver if I first know (am certain) that (p) whatever I perceive clearly and distinctly is true. A. Doney holds the line that Descartes’ is using the existence of God only to provide a principle of veracity for his memory that what he ‘once clearly distinctly perceived is true’ remains true and is true. The atheist geometer cannot trust in his memory, while Descartes’ of meditation IV can so attest to the veracity of his memories of what he thought he knew clearly and distinctly. But Frankfurt has pointed out that between the following three propositions: 1. I remember clearly and distinctly perceiving that p 2. So , I did clearly and distinctly perceive p 3. So, p is true. For Doney the inference to 3 is blocked at the transition from 1 to 2. But Frankfurt
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The Cartesian Circle and the Problem of the Criterion - The...

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