canterbury tales

canterbury tales - The Pardoner and His Tale Within the...

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The Pardoner and His Tale Within the Canterbury Tales, relationships can often be found between the teller of the story and the tale that is told. By analyzing their tales, much can be learned about the teller of the tale. This relationship holds true with the Pardoner, who ultimately reveals his true nature and way of life by sharing his story with the other pilgrims. In both the Pardoner's Tale and the prologue of the tale, the stories, sermons and confessions that he shares to his audience mirror his own negative characteristics, including greed, hypocrisy, gluttony and lechery. Through the Prologue to the Pardoner's tale, the true nature of the Pardoner is revealed. Within the prologue, the Pardoner displays his greed, confessing that his sole purpose of joining the pilgrimage was to outwit the pilgrims into giving him money, much like his usual techniques of preaching sermons and scamming peasants. The Pardoner admits "I preach nothing except for gain" (Line 105), and displays his avarice. He is without a doubt a hypocrite, and feels no shame in exploiting Christian principles in order to fulfill his own avarice. The main message of the Pardoner's tale, "the love of money is the root
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course FYSEM 101 taught by Professor Locke during the Spring '08 term at Bard College.

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canterbury tales - The Pardoner and His Tale Within the...

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