ALLITERATION - ALLITERATION Alliteration Is a stylistic literary device identified by the repeated sound of the first consonant in a series of

ALLITERATION - ALLITERATION Alliteration Is a...

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ALLITERATION Alliteration Is a stylistic literary device identified by the repeated sound of the first consonant in a series of multiple words, or the repetition of the same sounds or of the same kinds of sounds at the beginning of words or in stressed syllables of a phrase. "Alliteration" comes from the Latin word “litera”, meaning “letters of the alphabet”, and the first known use of the word to refer to a literary device occurred around 1624. Alliteration developed largely through poetry, in which it more narrowly refers to the repetition of a consonant in any syllables that, according to the poem's meter, are stressed, as in James Thomson's verse "Come…dragging the lazy languid Line along". Another example is, "Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers". Consonance (ex: As the wind will bend) is another 'phonetic agreement' akin to alliteration. It refers to the repetition of consonant sounds. Alliteration is a special case of consonance where the repeated consonant sound is at the stressed syllable. Alliteration may also include the use of different consonants with similar properties such as alliterating z with s, as does the author of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, or as Anglo-Saxon (Old English) poets would alliterate hard/fricative g with soft g (the latter exemplified in some courses as the letter yogh - - pronounced like the y in yarrow ȝ or the j in Jotunheim); this is known as license.[citation needed] There is one specialised form of alliteration called Symmetrical Alliteration. That is, alliteration containing parallelism. In this case, the phrase must have a pair of outside end words both starting with the same sound, and pairs of outside words also starting with matching sounds as one moves progressively closer to the centre. For example, "rust brown blazers rule", "purely and fundamentally for analytical purposes" or "fluoro colour co-ordination forever". Symmetrical alliteration is similar to palindromes in its use of symmetry. 1. Alice’s aunt ate apples and acorns around August. 2. Becky’s beagle barked and bayed, becoming bothersome for Billy. 3. Carrie's cat clawed her couch, creating chaos. 4. Dan’s dog dove deep in the dam, drinking dirty water as he dove. 5. Eric’s eagle eats eggs, enjoying each episode of eating. 6. Fred’s friends fried Fritos for Friday’s food. 7. Garry’s giraffe gobbled gooseberryies greedily, getting good at grabbing goodies. 8. Hannah’s home has heat hopefully. 9. Isaacs ice cream is interesting and Isaac is imbibing it. 10. Jesse’s jaguar is jumping and jiggling jauntily. 11. Kim’s kid’s kept kiting. 12. Larry’s lizard likes leaping leopards. 13. Mike’s microphone made much music. 14. Nick’s nephew needed new notebooks now not never. 15. Orson’s owl out-performed ostriches. 16. Peter’s piglet pranced priggishly. 17. Quincy’s quilters quit quilting quickly. 18. Ralph’s reindeer rose rapidly and ran round the room. 19. Sara’s seven sisters slept soundly in sand. 20. Tim’s took tons of tools to make toys for tots. 21. Uncle Uris’ united union uses umbrellas. 22. Vivien’s very vixen-like and vexing. 23. Walter walked wearily while wondering where Wally was.

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