Mongol_Docs_2020 (1) - Mongols DBQ 6 of 15 \u270e Notes Document 1 Source Map created from various sources Paris SV The Mongol Empire Vienna circa

Mongol_Docs_2020 (1) - Mongols DBQ 6 of 15 u270e Notes...

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125 © 2005 The DBQ Project This page may be reproduced for classroom use Mongols DBQ 6 of 15 SV Notes Document 1 Source: Map created from various sources. Note: The area of the continental United States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) is 3,036,885 square miles. 1,000 miles 1,000 kilometers 0 0 Black Sea Mediterranean Sea a e S n a i p s a C L. Baikal L. Balkhash Aral Sea P e r s i a n G u l f Sea of Japan Yellow Sea Arabian Sea Bay of Bengal South China Sea PACIFIC OCEAN Red Sea JAPAN G O L D E N H O R D E (Russia) I L K H A N A T E (Persia) C H A G H A D A I K H A N A T E (Central Asia) K H A N A T E O F T H E G R E A T K H A N (China) Samarkand Hangzhou Daidu (Beijing) Shangdu (Kaiping) Karakorum Agra Delhi Tabriz Jerusalem Nishapur Baghdad Kiev Pest Rome Vienna Paris Buda Moscow Mongol invasion forces wrecked by storms 1274 and 1281 Ain Julut Egyptian Mamluks defeat Mongols, 1260 The Mongol Empire circa 1260–1300 Size of World Conquests Conquerors Square Miles Conquered 1. Genghis Khan (1162-1227) 4,860,000 2. Alexander the Great (356 - 323 BCE) 2,180,000 3. Tamerlane (1336 -1405) 2,145,000 4. Cyrus the Great (600 - 529 BCE) 2,090,000 5. Attila (406 - 453) 1,450,000 6. Adolf Hitler (1889 -1945) 1,370,000 7. Napoleon Bonaparte (1769 -1821) 720,000
127 © 2005 The DBQ Project This page may be reproduced for classroom use Mongols DBQ 7 of 15 SV Notes Source: John of Plano Carpini, History of the Mongols , in Christopher Dawson, The Mongol Mission , London: Sheed and Ward, 1955. Document 2 Note: John of Plano Carpini was a Franciscan emissary of Pope Innocent IV and traveled to Karakorum between 1245 and 1247. It is believed he was the first European to visit the Mongols in their homeland. Genghis Khan ordained that the army should be organized in such a way that over ten men should beset one man and he is what we call a captain of ten; over ten of these should be placed one, named a captain of a hundred; at the head of ten captains of a hundred is placed a soldier known as a captain of a thousand, and over ten captains of a thousand is one man, and the word they use for this number is tuman . Two or three chiefs are in command of the whole army, yet in such a way that one holds the supreme command. When they are in battle, if one or two or three or even more out of a group of ten run away, all are put to death; and if a whole group of ten flees, the rest of the group of a hundred are all put to death, if they do not flee too. In a word, unless they retreat in a body, all who take flight are put to death. Likewise if one or two or more go forward boldly to the fight, then the rest of the ten are put to death if they do not follow and, if one or more of the ten are captured, their companions are put to death if they do not rescue them.
129 © 2005 The DBQ Project This page may be reproduced for classroom use Mongols DBQ 8 of 15 SV Notes Document 3 Source: John of Plano Carpini, History of the Mongols , in Christopher Dawson, The Mongol Mission, London: Sheed and Ward,1955.

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