Tabloid Journalism Paper

Tabloid Journalism Paper - Green1 Tabloid Journalism An...

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Green1 Tabloid Journalism: An Examination MacKenzie Green CBR 102 Introduction to Electronic Media Dr. Michel Dupagne November 11, 2007
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Green2 Tabloid journalism is not a new phenomenon. “The use of the word tabloid journalism dates from the turn of the century…tabloid began to mean anything given or taken in a compressed or condensed form – including news” (Day 25). As early as the news ballots in Europe during the late 1500s, the Penny Presses of the 1830s, and in 1833, when critics panned the New York Sun because it contained humor and stories about suicides. There has been a public outcry against tabloid/sensationalism journalism. Sensationalist journalism has had a rightful place along side conventional “valid news” (Day 12). Therefore, the recent preoccupation with sensational news should not come as a shock. We are going through one of its cyclical periods. As we look at tabloid news, we need to always keep in the back of our mind that there is a historical perspective, and that it is not a unique problem of contemporary times. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relevance of tabloid journalism in today’s media. Tabloid journalism is considered newsworthy because it fits within the requirements of real news. News is meant to inform, present facts, it does not speculate, and professionals control it. The criteria that define news are timing, significance, proximity, prominence and human interest. Tabloid journalism covers what is up to the minute news. Timing is important to news because news is just that, new and current information. Sensationalism covers what is happening right now. News is a time sensitive medium. Which is why we have breaking news stories, and up to the minute news. It is also the reason that we have twenty-four hour news stations. However, in this age of twenty-four hour news coverage you have to feed the beast. That beast is primarily feed with sensational topics, when there are no pressing news or breaking news stories to cover. Significance is another requirement of what defines “true news.” The topics of
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Green3 sensational journalism hold certain significance to the audience that it is intended to reach. In a fast food generation, we also prefer our significant information to come in bite sized, easily comprehensible pieces (Grabe). People watch television to escape, find entertainment, and to get information. What holds more of a precedent in their minds is the sensational topics that flood the airways now. (Day 11-12) The criterion of proximity is always blurred with sensational and tabloid journalism. Perhaps, the stories of Young Hollywood are not happening in our backyard, but the tales of misguided and troubled youth resonate with people in some way or another, no matter where you live. Those topics have an emotional and social proximity. You may live in Montana, miles from the dazzling setting of Hollywood, but the topics connect to you no matter where your location. What makes tabloid/sensational journalism such a crowd-drawing act is the prominence
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course COMM 250 taught by Professor Dupagne during the Spring '07 term at University of Miami.

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Tabloid Journalism Paper - Green1 Tabloid Journalism An...

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