Lecture 3 - Lecture 3 2/05/08 Epic language Homer uses a...

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Lecture 3 2/05/08 Epic language Homer uses a lot of epithets (repeated phrase used by storyteller to summarize a character) –– “Agamemnon, lord of men, brilliant Achilles”. They recur at predictable places in the line. They are keyed to the meter of the poem: Epic hexameter. Poetic feet can be binary (two syllables and ternary (three syllables) . (Note: Stressed syllable /; Unstressed syllable _ ) Hamlet is written in iambic pentameter: five poetic feet _ /_ /_ /_ /_ / // (two stressed syllables) – a spondee Ternary : Anapestic _ _ / Amphibrachic _ / _ Dactyllic / _ _ Ancient Greek works focus on the length of syllables instead of the stress of the syllables. Homer uses Dactylic Hexameter: 6 poetic feet Hexameter (six-measure of line) Dactyl / _ _ Homeric dactylic hexameter: six-foot lines (18 syllables /_ _ /_ _ /_ _ / _ _ / _ _ / _ _) Homer feels free to use spondees ( / / ). The use of epithets oftentimes has to do with the arrangements of the
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course EUR 101 taught by Professor Westphalen during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 3 - Lecture 3 2/05/08 Epic language Homer uses a...

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