Lecture 5 - Lecture 5 Gods in Iliad • Melodramatic and sometimes contradictory interactions among divine figures(see the opening scene where

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 5 02/12/08 Gods in Iliad • Melodramatic and sometimes contradictory interactions among divine figures (see the opening scene where Apollo, Zeus and the other two goddesses fight) • The problem of free will (If Achilles followed his “free will” he would have killed Agamemnon, but Athena stopped him.) free will vs. determinism • Human being exist somewhere on the scale between freedom and determinism • destiny/fate seems to be driven by Zeus’ will . However, Zeus is not omnipotent: there are occasions in which Zeus’ will is restrained by destiny (e.g. the story of Patroclus killing Sarpedon, Zeus’ favorite son, against Zeus’ will). It’s Zeus's duty not to intervene with fate. • Neither absolute free will nor determinism dominates Homeric works entirely • Problem for Christian theologians: Christ argued for human free will Human mortality => seriousness (e.g. Hector's mortality in Book 6) Gods' immortality allows humorous situations (they can fight again and again) => Most of the comedy is...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course EUR 101 taught by Professor Westphalen during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 5 - Lecture 5 Gods in Iliad • Melodramatic and sometimes contradictory interactions among divine figures(see the opening scene where

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