Logic 9-25 - Philosophy of the Human Person Logic...

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Philosophy of the Human Person Logic Presentation Logic Presentation September 25, 2007 September 25, 2007
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Review: Distinction between Inductive and Deductive Arguments An argument is deductive if and only if its proponent maintains that it is impossible for its premises to be true and its conclusion false. An argument is inductive if and only if its proponent maintains that the truth of its premises makes its conclusion likely (though not absolutely certain ).
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Inductive Arguments An argument is inductive if and only if “the arguer claims that it is improbable that the conclusion be false given that the premises are true.” (44) We’ll talk a lot more about inductive arguments in November. For now, we’ll recognize a few key notions: Strong vs. Weak inductive arguments Cogent vs. Uncogent inductive arguments
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Strong vs. Weak Inductive Arguments We know: an argument is inductive if and only its proponent maintains that the truth of its premises makes its conclusion likely. Strong inductive argument = def an inductive argument the premises of which do in fact make the conclusion likely. “A strong inductive argument is an inductive argument in which it is improbable that the conclusion be false given that the premises are true.” (44) A weak inductive argument = def an inductive argument the premises of which do not make the conclusion likely.
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Is the following statement true or false? 61% 39% True False An inductive argument with false premises may be strong. 1. 1. True True 2. 2. False False
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Strong vs. Weak Inductive Arguments Note: Just as a deductive argument with false premises can be valid, an inductive argument with false premises can be strong. Example: 1. The vast majority of Tommies living on campus clean their dorm rooms using telekinesis. 2. Therefore, Megan Peterson, a Tommie living on campus, probably cleans her dorm room using telekinesis.
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88%
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHIL 115 taught by Professor Stoltz during the Fall '07 term at St. Thomas.

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Logic 9-25 - Philosophy of the Human Person Logic...

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