CHCYTH002 NOTES - 1 THE INDUSTRIAL RESOLUTION Youth work first emerged in the late nineteenth century as a response to the perceived \u2018threat\u2019

CHCYTH002 NOTES - 1 THE INDUSTRIAL RESOLUTION Youth...

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1. THE INDUSTRIAL RESOLUTION; Youth work first emerged in the late nineteenth century as a response to the perceived ‘threat’ of young working class males and a few females on the public streets. This was largely a result of widespread changes to the economy, which, like today, saw less jobs being available for young people. PROBLEM YOUTH; As Labour and Factory laws pushed young people out of paid work, a whole new part of life between childhood and adulthood emerged: so was ‘youth’ born and, in the same process, youth work. As the institutions of school and work developed other questions also become crucial: what were young people doing after school, and what were young workers doing with their wages? THE NEED TO REGULATE; Before the development of compulsory schooling or formal organizations (like the scouts) there was a strong need to regulate the activities of disorderly working class boys (or larrikins) – girls were virtually ignored unless they were felt to be in moral (i.e. sexual) danger. MORAL BASE; The early forms of youth work were religious, value based and often controlling. There was a strong concern to keep young people away from the organised groups i.e. unions and radical political parties. Arguably there is little difference in the sorts of ideas that abound about young people today and the sorts of responses that youth organizations and agencies make. The ‘immoral’ larrikins’ of a hundred years ago may have become the ‘street kids’ of the 1990s. But the concerns are much the same. There is still a dual objective to somehow control the behaviour of such young people for the good of themselves and society; and to somehow improve or change the circumstances in which they live (whether through remaining at school, providing the Job Search and Youth Allowances on mutual obligation i.e. work for the dole) Well, that’s it for the brief history of Youth Workers. Historical contexts of youth work The development of youth work as a practice in Australia has been heavily influenced by values from faith-based interventions through to a social justice focus. It was not until well into the 20th century that it became subject to regular government intervention. (Bessant 1997 in AYAC 2011)
How youth work evolved in Australia With the development of a left-wing political focus during the sixties and seventies, through student protests in universities, both the greater community and government were forced to pay attention to the views of young people around issues such as ending the Vietnam War and army conscription. During this time period, several universities developed and actioned Student Representative Councils. This way of working with young people was empowering due to their participation and from that point onwards services began to look at ways to build the skills of young people to assist them in making their own decisions. (Bessant 1997, in AYAC 2011) Up until the early seventies, the bulk of formal youth work was implemented by the non- government, not for profit community sector. However, government bodies at this point became

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