Chemistry Notes

Chemistry Notes - Block 2 Chemistry Notes 10-1 Scientist developed the kinetic molecular theory of matter to account for the behavior of the atoms

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1/9/06 Block 2 Chemistry Notes 10-1 Scientist developed the kinetic molecular theory of matter to account for the behavior of the atoms and molecules that make up matter. Kinetic-molecular theory - based on the idea that particles of matter are always in motion. The theory can be used to explain the properties of solids, liquids, and gases in terms of the energy of particles and the forces that act between them. Kinetic-molecular theory of gases- helps understand behavior of gas molecules and the physical properties of gases Ideal gas- an imaginary gas that perfectly fits all the assumptions of the kinetic- molecular theory. 5 Assumptions- 1. Gases consist of large numbers of tiny particles that are far apart relative to their size. Most of the volume occupied by a gas is empty space. This accounts for the lower density of gases compared with that of liquids and solids. It also explain the fact that gases are easily compressed 2. Collisions between gas particles and between particles and container walls are elastic collisions. Elastic collision - one in which there is no net loss of kinetic energy. Kinetic energy is transferred during collisions. Total kinetic energy of the 2 particles remains the same as long as temperature is constant. 3.
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course CHEM 135 taught by Professor Brooks during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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Chemistry Notes - Block 2 Chemistry Notes 10-1 Scientist developed the kinetic molecular theory of matter to account for the behavior of the atoms

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