gdi-2011-politics-master-file-mercury

shelby described last thursdays meeting with bolden

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Unformatted text preview: le Defense Report, 11 (2-28-11, Vol 12 No. 5, NASA Supporters: New Spending Plan Does Not Jibe With Law, Lexis) AC President Barack Obama proposed an $18.7 billion NASA budget for fiscal year 2012 recently that some supporters of the space agency said does not jibe with Congress' wishes. The FY '12 measure, which freezes NASA spending at FY '10 levels, supports President Barack Obama's plan to dismantle President George W. Bush's Constellation space-exploration program and support the development of a commercial space industry. Yet the request to Congress does not completely jibe with the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, which Obama signed into law last October and authorizes $58.4 billion for the agency from FY '11 through FY '13, NASA supporters said. "We are disappointed with the proposed fiscal year 2012 budget for NASA of $18.7 billion, which represents a cut of $750 million from the authorized level and a major drop of more than $6.2 billion from the fiscal year 2011 request over the next four years," Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) President and Chief Executive Officer Marion Blakey said recently. One difference between the NASA authorization measure and the FY '12 appropriations measure unveiled recently is the level of funding for bolstering commercial space companies that could carry crew and cargo to low-Earth orbit. The appropriations bill would spend $850 million, while the authorization law calls for $612 million. The newly proposed FY '12 appropriations bill also contains approximately $1 billion less in funding for a new heavy-lift rocket than in the authorization measure, observers said. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), chairman of the Senate Commerce Space and Science subcommittee, signaled recently he will try to change Obama's FY '12 NASA proposal. "In this time of necessary budget cuts, NASA does well compared to most other agencies," Nelson, a one-time astronaut, said in a statement. "But the president's budget does not follow the bi-partisan NASA law Congress passed late last year. The Congress will assert its priorities in the next six months." NASA said in a statement recently that its FY '12 budget proposal "supports all elements of NASA's 2010 Authorization Act." Gonzaga Debate Institute 2011 85 Mercury Politics NASA Funding – Popular – Congress (3/3) Congress wants more NASA funding Foust, Senior Analyst with the Futron Corporation, 11 (Jeff, 3/16/11, Spacepolitics.com blog, “Senate hearing emphasizes uncertainty”, http://www.spacepolitics.com/2011/03/16/senate-hearing-emphasizes-uncertainty/ , 6/21/11) EK Complicating matters is the current budget environment, with another three-week continuing resolution (CR) set to be enacted later this week. That CR keeps in place language that keeps NASA from terminating Constellation programs. Pressed on how much money NASA has “wasted”, in the words of Sen. Nelson, on Constellation programs as a result of that provision, Cooke would only say a “small amount” had been wasted, without giving a specific amount, saying that work was being phased on existing contracts so t...
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