gdi-2011-politics-master-file-mercury

Gdi-2011-politics-master-file-mercury

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Unformatted text preview: evenly divided. Gonzaga Debate Institute 2011 110 Mercury Politics ***Links – Aeronautics Gonzaga Debate Institute 2011 111 Mercury Politics Aeronautics – Triggers Debate (1/2) NASA’s role in aeronautics triggers debate Morgan, Congressional Research Service spet in science and technology policy, 7-8-10 [Daniel, Congressional Research Service, “The Future of NASA: Space Policy Issues Facing Congress”, p. 14, opencrs.com/document/R41016/, accessed 6-20-11, AFB] After human spaceflight and science, NASA’s largest activity is research on aeronautics , the science and technology of flight within Earth’s atmosphere. There is a history of disagreement in Congress about the appropriate role of this program. Supporters argue that the aviation industry is vital to the economy, especially because aircraft are a major component of U.S. exports. They claim that government funding for aeronautics research can contribute to U.S. competitiveness and is necessary in light of similar programs in Europe and elsewhere.50 Opponents counter that the aviation industry itself should pay for the R&D it needs. Against the background of this debate, NASA aeronautics programs have focused increasingly on long-term fundamental R&D and on research topics with clear public purposes, such as reducing noise and emissions, improving safety, and improving air traffic control. Congress has directed NASA to keep its aeronautics programs within national policy stipulations Morgan, Congressional Research Service spet in science and technology policy, 7-8-10 [Daniel, Congressional Research Service, “The Future of NASA: Space Policy Issues Facing Congress”, p. 14-5, opencrs.com/document/R41016/, accessed 6-20-11, AFB] In 2005, Congress directed the President to develop a national policy for aeronautics R&D.51 The National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), part of the Executive Office of the President, issued this policy in December 2006.52 The policy established general principles and goals for federal aeronautics activities, laid out the roles and responsibilities of NASA and other agencies, and directed the NSTC to issue a national aeronautics R&D plan at least every two years. The NSTC released the first national aeronautics R&D plan in December 2007 and the second in February 2010.53 The NASA Authorization Act of 2008 stated that NASA’s aeronautics research program should be “guided by and consistent with” the national aeronautics R&D policy.54 In June 2006, in response to a congressional mandate, the National Research Council of the National Academies released a decadal strategy for federal civil aeronautics activities, with a particular emphasis on NASA’s aeronautics research program.55 Along with other recommendations, the report identified 51 technology challenges to serve as the foundation for aeronautics research at NASA for the next decade. In the 2008 authorization act, Congress directed NASA to align its fundamental aeronautics research program with these technology challenges “to the maximum extent practicable within available funding” and to increase the involvement of universities and other external organizations in that program.56 It also mand...
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This note was uploaded on 01/14/2013 for the course POL 090 taught by Professor Framer during the Spring '13 term at Shimer.

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