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Exam 1 - Study Guide - Exam 1 Study Guide 1 What is sport...

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Exam 1: Study Guide 1. What is sport psychology? What are the three types of sport psychologists? How are the three types of sport psychologists similar and different in scope of practice and training? Sport psychology is the study of the psychological processes (thoughts, moods/emotions, personality traits) as antecedents, concomitants, and consequences of sport or athletic performance. Sport psychology is composed of three types of psychologists: clinical sport psychologists, educational sport psychologists, and research sport psychologists. The clinical sport psychologist typically does clinical research on needs of athletes or performs clinical psychology for the more serious needs of athletes. This type requires a license and Ph. D. in psychology. An educational sport psychologist typically teaches athletes about imagery, goal setting, or other techniques for performance enhancement. This type of sport psychologist, however, should never deal with real psychological issues. It requires a Ph. D. in kinesiology or exercise psychology. The research sport psychologist typically does research in a laboratory to investigate if certain techniques for sport psychology do or don’t work. There is no law on who can perform this type of research. The only requirement is an understanding of research methods. 2. What is an ergogenic aid? What are examples of ergogenic aids? Why is the understanding of ergogenic aids important for sport psychology? Ergogenic aids are substances and phenomena such as imagery, training, home field advantage, etc. that enhance athletic performance. Some examples are steroids, blood doping, and imagery. It is important to understand ergogenic aids in relation to sport psychology because it is crucial to know if a substance is safe and if a phenomena or substance is effective and how performance can be improved using different techniques and find which are suitable for which person. 3. What are the similarities and differences between descriptive, predictive, and experimental research?
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