philo 1 - Carl Crittenden Editor: Mark Rodgers Date of 1st...

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Carl Crittenden Editor: Mark Rodgers Date of 1 st Draft: September 28, 2007 Date of Final Draft: ??? MWF: 11:00am Short Paper on Book IX In the ninth book of Plato’s Republic, Socrates describes a new outlook on the three classes of a city each having their own pleasure. He follows up by stating that the philosophical class can serve as the best judge of pleasure because it has experience all three pleasures in life, however, I disagree. Through this paper, I will argue that a philosopher has not experienced all the pleasures in life and, therefore, is not the best judge of which way of life is most pleasurable, while determining that the other two classes are better judges. Socrates claims that the best judge of a pleasurable life is a philosopher because he has experienced honor, wealth, and knowledge. He then claims that honor-lovers and profit-lovers will never know the truth nor will they ever learn unless it is for the improvement of their own respected desires 1 . Throughout the book, I do not notice any
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philo 1 - Carl Crittenden Editor: Mark Rodgers Date of 1st...

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