Assignment7Worksheet_AztecTributeExercise_Nelson,Jessica.docx

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ASB 337 Fall 2020 B AZTEC TRIBUTE EXERCISE WORKSHEET General Instructions : Download the Assignment 7 Materials document and the Aztec Tribute Item Key, and read through the directions on the Assignment 7 page* on Canvas carefully before beginning this Worksheet (* This includes important information on Aztec number symbols used in the codex ). Note that in order to answer the Question in Part I, it may be helpful to print the map and/or color code the strategic and tributary provinces on the map based on Table 1 listings. Read the background “On Aztec Tribute” section before continuing on to Part I and II below. Follow the specific (bulleted) instructions for Part I and Part II. ON AZTEC TRIBUTE The Triple Alliance (i.e. the Aztecs) presided over a large tribute empire, which was centered at Tenochtitlan. By 1502, during the rule of Moteczuma the Younger, the empire was collecting tributefrom the tropical forests of the Gulf Coast to the beaches of the Pacific Ocean. Aztec merchants had even opened trade to areas of Guatemala, likely in preparation for further conquests. The Aztec collection of tribute was not merely for material gain, though. It was an active and vital part of their imperial strategy.PART I – IMPERIAL PROVINCESUse the background information below along with the map and table in the Assignment 7 Materials document to answer both parts of the question that follows.Please typeyour response in full sentences in the space below each part (a. and b.) of question 1.Imperial Provinces Background: Aztec imperial strategies led to the creation of two types of provinces in the outer empire: tributary provinces and strategic provinces (Berdan 1996, Smith 2003). Tributary provinces were groups of adjacent, conquered city-states that provided regular tribute and trade. Records of these provinces and their tribute were kept at imperial capitals. The lists of tribute in two codices, the Matricula de Tributos and the Codex Mendoza, allow us to identify these tributary provinces. Strategic provinces were conquered client-states that could help maintain the borders of the Aztec Empire against enemies in lieu of paying regular tribute. These provinces were not listed in the tribute rolls, but are gathered from lists of Aztec conquests and other sources.1. a. Describe the spatial distribution of tributary versus strategic provinces as depicted in the map** of Aztec imperial provinces in 1519 CE. (**Again, note that the numbers on the map correspond to the numbers of the provinces listed in Table 1). (2 pts )

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