Philosophy 1 Notes

Philosophy 1 Notes - Beast-Machine TheoryPersonal...

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Beast-Machine Theory- Personal Identity- Smith: Brain Tumor Jones- Car Crash Biomedical Ethics- Socrates and Plato Apology: Introduction Structure of the Apology Defense and Defining Socrates (469-399 b.c.e.) (1) GadFly (2) Midwife Elenchus- cross-examination Sophisits- Socrates enemies Plato (3) Development and Dogma (1) Delphi C Oracle (2) Divine Sign (Daimon) (3) Gods gift to Athens Socrates defense of the pursuit of philosophy is the unexamined life worth living? Is death a blessing 1. Comman to sign at his post 2. Possible evil vs. known evil Obedience death (possible evil Disobedience (Dismour) (known evil) God’s commands trump humans ones. Jones is either a crook or a fool If hes a crook you shouldn’t vote for him If hes a fool you shouldn’t vote for him Either way you shouldn’t vote for him 1. Death is either annihalation or its change in the souls location
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2. if its annihilation is it’s a blessing and if it’s a change in the souls location, is a blessing 3. either way it is a blessing The problem of political obligation Crito Introo-overview Three arguments for obedience to laws So and the social contract Grounds Limits 1) Dialogue vs. Speech 2) Obedience vs defiance 1) The argument from just agreements January 22, 2008 Plato: Conclusions To what has Socrates consented? Apology and Crito : The problem of consistency Socrates and the tradition of civil disobedience. I. Socrates a. Obeys the laws i. He has made a just agreement and obeys the laws b. 3 issues related to the verdicts and sentences i. The target/object of verdict and sentence 1. self or fellow-citizens ii. The justice of the verdicts and sentences 1. just or unjust iii. The severity of the sentence 1. Capital punishment or lesser penalty II. Hobbes (1588-1679) 1. Hobbes says you have a perfect right to save yourself (do everything you can to do se even though you agreed to obey the laws) b. A desire of self- preservation 1. According to Hobbes, do not consent to the execution because of self preservation III. a. Are we obligated to obey the laws (Socrates: Yes Hobbes: Yes) b. Are we obligated to submit to just capital punishment (Socrates: Yes Hobbes: No) c. Are we obligate to unjust capital punishment (Socrates Yes Hobbes: No) IV. Natural law theory St. Thomas Advints (1225-74)
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a. Hobbes i. Legal positivism form counts not content V. Socrates Apology and Crito a. His position in the Crito is inconsistent to his position in the Apology i. In Crito, the citizen must obey the laws and sentences of the court
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course CRM LAW SC C7 taught by Professor Schmann during the Spring '08 term at UC Irvine.

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Philosophy 1 Notes - Beast-Machine TheoryPersonal...

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