Adducts and fixates the scapula the only muscle of

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Unformatted text preview: ore: Response The primary adductor of the humerus. A back muscle which adducts and medially rotates the humerus. Adducts and laterally rotates the humerus. A rotator cuff muslce which also abducts the humerus. The primary abductor of the shoulder joint. Value 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 2/2 4. extensor carpi radialis longus Inflammation of the origin of this muscle on the lateral epicondyle of the humerus produces "tennis elbow". brachioradialis Maintains the wrist in a partially abducted position when carrying something. brachialis Elbow extensor. triceps brachii Its origin is on the medial epicondyle of the humerus. flexor carpi ulnaris The primary synergist of the biceps brachii Statement Response extensor carpi radialis longus Inflammation of the origin of this muscle on the lateral epicondyle of the humerus produces "tennis elbow". Value 20.0% Statement brachioradialis brachialis triceps brachii flexor carpi ulnaris Score: Response Maintains the wrist in a partially abducted position when carrying something. The primary synergist of the biceps brachii Elbow extensor. Its origin is on the medial epicondyle of the humerus. Value 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 2/2 5 Match the muscles with their descriptions. quadratus lumborum Flexes the thigh (hip joint). iliopsoas Unilaterally abducts (laterally flexes) the trunk gluteus maximus Inserts on the iliotibial tract along with the gluteus maximus to abduct and fixate the knee gluteus minimus Extends the thigh for running and climbing; fixates in an extended position when standing. tensor fascia latae Abducts and rotates the thigh when walking Statement quadratus lumborum iliopsoas gluteus maximus gluteus minimus tensor fascia latae Score: Response Unilaterally abducts (laterally flexes) the trunk Flexes the thigh (hip joint). Extends the thigh for running and climbing; fixates in an extended position when standing. Abducts and rotates the thigh when walking Inserts on the iliotibial tract along with the gluteus maximus to abduct and fixate the knee Value 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 2/2 1. The cell bodies of spinal sensory neurons are located in: Student Response Value A. spinal gray matter B. spinal white matter C. dorsal root ganglion 0% 0% 100% D. ventral root ganglion 0% Score: 1/1 2. Multipolar neurons function as: Student Response A. B. C. D. spinal and cranial nerve sensory neurons spinal and cranial nerve motor neurons spinal and cranial interneurons all of the above E. #2 and #3 only Score: 1/1 Value 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 3. Which of the following tracts is responsible for conscious sensations? Student Response A. spinocerebellar tract B. Fasciculus cuneatus and fasciculus gracilis C. spinothalamic tract D. both #2 and #3 Score: Value 0% 0% 0% 100% 1/1 4. Fibers which cross in the pyramids are concerned with: Student Response A. Motor control on the same side of the body as their origin. B. Motor control on the opposite side of the body from their origin. Value 0% 100% C. Motor control for equilibrium and balance. D. Proprioception and muscle sense. E. Both answers #3 and #4. 0% 0% Score: 0% 1/1 5. The criterion for an area bein...
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2013 for the course BIOL 239 taught by Professor Swan during the Fall '12 term at New Mexico.

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