31 Oct 07

31 Oct 07 - Post-Translational Modifications Most proteins...

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Post-Translational Modifications Most proteins go through an extensive series of processing steps, collectively called post- translational modifications , before they are ready to go to work in a cell.
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Release factors A. fit tightly into the P site of the ribosome and displace the peptidyl tRNA. B. cause the polypeptide being synthesized to be released from the tRNA in the E site. C. are tRNAs that are not “loaded” with an amino acid. D. bind to the small subunit of the ribosome. E. None of the above
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Introns often contain termination ("stop") codons (UAA, UGA, UAG), but these codons do not interrupt the translation of any protein. Why not? A. UAA, UGA, and UAG are "start" codons, not termination codons. B. They are removed before translation. C. These triplets cause frameshift mutations, not termination. D. More than one termination codon is needed to stop translation.
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Folding takes place as the polypeptide leaves the ribosome (before translation is complete). Molecular “chaperones
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31 Oct 07 - Post-Translational Modifications Most proteins...

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