Chapter 28 - CR

Chapter 28 - CR - Chapter 28 Protists 1 of 30 A World in a...

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1 of 30 of 30 Chapter 28 Chapter 28 Protists
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2 of 30 of 30 A World in a Drop of Water A World in a Drop of Water Even a low-power microscope can reveal an astonishing menagerie of organisms in a drop of pond water Protists are mostly single-celled eukaryotes Advances in eukaryotic systematics have caused the classification of protists to change significantly Figure 28.1 50 μ m
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3 of 30 of 30 Protists are an extremely diverse Protists are an extremely diverse assortment of eukaryotes assortment of eukaryotes Protists are more diverse than all other eukaryotes Most protists are unicellular, some are colonial or multicellular Protists are nutritionally diverse Photoautotrophs contain chloroplasts Heterotrophs absorb organic molecules or ingest larger food particles Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis and heterotrophic nutrition Protist habitats are also diverse Include freshwater and marine species Reproduction and life cycles Highly varied with both sexual and asexual species
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4 of 30 of 30 Endosymbiosis in Eukaryotic Endosymbiosis in Eukaryotic Evolution Evolution Protist diversity shows evidence of having its origins in endosymbiosis The plastid-bearing lineage of protists evolved into red algae and green algae Secondary endosymbiosis has occurred Red algae and green algae underwent this several times, in which they themselves were ingested
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5 of 30 of 30 Cyanobacterium Heterotrophic eukaryote Primary endosymbiosis Red algae Green algae Secondary endosymbiosis Secondary endosymbiosis Plastid Dinoflagellates Apicomplexans Ciliates Stramenopiles Euglenids Chlorarachniophytes Plastid Alveolates Figure 28.3 Diversity of plastids produced by secondary endosymbiosis
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6 of 30 of 30 28.2: Diplomonads and parabasalids have modified mitochondria Adapted to anaerobic environments, lack plastids, and have mitochondria that lack DNA, an electron transport chain, or citric-acid cycle enzymes Diplomonads have two nuclei and multiple flagella Parabasalids include trichomonads ,which move by means of flagella and an undulating part of the plasma membrane 5 µm (a) Giardia intestinalis, a diplomonad Figure 28.5a Figure 28.5b (b) Trichomonas vaginalis, a parabasalid Flagella Undulating membrane 5 µm
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7 of 30 of 30 28.3: Euglenozoans have flagella 28.3: Euglenozoans have flagella with a unique internal structure with a unique internal structure Euglenozoa is a diverse clade that includes Predatory heterotrophs Photosynthetic autotrophs Pathogenic parasites Main feature that distinguishes protists in this clade The presence of a spiral or crystalline rod of unknown function inside their flagella Flagella 0.2 µm Crystalline rod Ring of microtubules Figure 28.6
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of 30 Kinetoplastids have a single, large mitochondrion that contains an organized mass of DNA called a kinetoplast Include free-living consumers of bacteria in freshwater, marine, and moist terrestrial
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Chapter 28 - CR - Chapter 28 Protists 1 of 30 A World in a...

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