Technology-Structures-and-Social-Boundaries-for-REVISED_9902332453469560e.doc

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1Technology Structures and Social Boundaries for OrganizationsStudent's NameInstitution AffiliationCourse NameProfessor's NameDate
2Technology Structures and Social Boundaries for OrganizationsIntroductionOne of the ongoing issues in the field of sociology is to perceive the corporateorganization and to study it in means that not only personify it but also do not reduce it to humanbehavior (Davis, 2014). As such, they argue that organizations perform significant roles in themodern world. According to Scott and Davis (2015), the presence of organizations today affectsalmost every industry in the modern-day social life. By and large, Scott and Davis (2015) studyorganizations, their nature and functions, how they have changed, and how individuals think aswell as study them. They concur that today's organizations share some features that distinguishthem from other social structures. These authors also introduce three vital concepts, includingrational, natural, as well as open system perspectives. Thus, this paper seeks to review the notionof technology structures and social boundaries for organizations. It also provides an overview ofthe technical and social terminology for organizations in the world today.Natural, Rational, and OpenIn their study,Scott and Davis (2015) identified three central perspectives, includingnatural, rational, as well as open structures. Understanding them is crucial because each of thesesystems marks pertinent references to organizations. Besides, each of these views also typifiesand expresses the historical emergence of the study of organizations. Indeed, the historicalorganizational formation reveals why these three viewpoints pay focus on specific regulatoryaspects. According to Scott and Davis (2015), the contemporary corporate concept might beunderstood as a blend of these perceptions.Őnday (2018) held that the study of organizationdeveloped during the early 90s. In attempts to respond to the high rationality of contemporary
3life, Weber (1968) argues that early scholars emphasized the legitimate rational rules and policiesthat govern organizations.From a rational view, organizations represent collectivities that often seek to pursuespecific goals. These organizations also demonstrate relatively high and formalized structures.According to Scott and Davis (2015), rational thinkers stress the formalization of organizationsand how they specify their goals. Some of the rational systems philosophies studied by diversetheorists included administrative, decision-making, and bureaucratic theories. By a large degree,scientific management, as a science, assumes a rational approach to organizations. This view,developed by Taylor (1911), measured and created more effective work regulations using formalmechanisms. Likewise, using case studies, Taylor (1911) determined that productivity could beoptimized by managing and controlling the production process. He proposed that firms ought toutilize scientific control as opposed to following regular managerial doctrines. For him, scientific

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Term
Summer
Professor
TBA
Tags
Management, Organizational studies

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