208 oil ddw 2012 1 low prices good state failure 209

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Unformatted text preview: malpractice may be a harbinger of the region’s future. 206 Oil DDW 2012 1 Low Prices Good – Interventionist Wars 207 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 High oil prices create public pressure and desperation to intervene to secure energy Moran, Professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. and Russell , 08 Daniel Moran, Professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. and James A. Russell, Associate Professor in the Department of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School, 3-7-08, [“The Militarization of Energy Security,” Saudi-US Relations Information Service, http://www.susris.com/articles/2008/ioi/080307-russell-energy.html] E. Liu The relationship between spiraling energy costs and global stability -- social, political, and strategic -- are not easy to anticipate in detail. On the whole it is reasonable to assume that the West and the rest of the developed world will be in the best position to afford higher costs. But they may also be the most susceptible to the pressure of public opinion and powerful economic interests. They also possess the most formidable military resources with which to intervene in the market, should they wish to do so. Developing states that are consumers of oil probably have the least leverage in market terms; but this may only make them more willing to choose the military option in moments of desperation. Such states are often disconnected from, and even hostile to, those features of economic globalization that are driving growth and development elsewhere, and may feel that they have little to lose in challenging a system that is failing them in any case. Oil-producing states can benefit from high prices only as long as demand does not collapse, or become translated into calls for direct action outside the boundaries of the market. In the latter case they can be expected to seek the protection of more powerful consumer states. Indeed, the emergence of such relationships, in anticipation of a deteriorating energy market, is one of the more likely ways in which the militarization of energy security may unfold. 208 Oil DDW 2012 1 Low Prices Good – State Failure 209 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 High oil prices stunt economic development, causing unrest and failed states Umbach, Centre for European Security Strategies (CESS), Munich-Berlin, Germany, 09 Frank Umbach, Centre for European Security Strategies (CESS), Munich-Berlin, Germany, 3-6-09, [“Global energy security and the implications for the EU,” Energy Policy Volume 38, Issue 3, March 2010, Pages 1229–1240, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421509000421] E. Liu As long as fossil fuels continue to dominate the global fuel mix, energy-related greenhouse gas emissions and increased reliance on imports of oil, gas and coal from politically unstable countries will increase concerns about climate change as well as energy security. Having no adequate and secure supplies of energy at affordabl...
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2013 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Burke during the Spring '13 term at Southern Arkansas University.

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