3466 category 10 energy and climate economics

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Unformatted text preview: weighed 307 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 Psychology shows impacts of warming are systemically underprioritized now Suranovic, Associate Professor of Economics and International Affairs, George Washington University 11 Steven Suranovic, Associate Professor of Economics and International Affairs, George Washington University, 11-11, [“Addicted to Oil: Implications for Climate Change Policy,” Institute for International Economic Policy Working Paper Series, http://www2.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/Suranovic_IIEPWP2011-22.pdf] E. Liu To many supporters of climate change actions, it is a puzzle why, despite 20-plus years of growing evidence of the dangers associated with climate change, there has been very little success in reducing the worlds’ trajectory of oil usage. [Hereafter the term “oil” refers to all carbon-based fuel sources.] Loewenstein (2009) attributes the problem to the psychology of human decision making. Research shows, for example, that humans are evolutionarily programmed to respond to immediate threats, but are poor at adapting to very gradual changes. Quicker reactions are also likely when the threat is from other humans, rather than from nature as it is with climate change. Human reactions to threats are also less likely when the effects are imperceptible, as they are with slight variations in temperature or rainfall activity. Loewenstein also points to the human tendency for wishful thinking, that is, believing that things will simply work out. A self serving bias may explain why developing countries tend to believe that the developed countries, the main polluters of the past, must act, whereas developed countries are unwilling to strike a deal unless the rapidly growing polluters (the developing countries) are heavily involved. Finally, Lowenstein points out that individual behaviors are very difficult to change even when the effects are felt more directly, as with dieting to relieve obesity. When effects are only felt by later generations and perhaps mostly in other countries, the task may be nearly impossible. Other problems suggested in the literature include the lack of personal experience with climate change combined with the difficulty of incorporating abstract scientific info into one’s decisions, [Hertwig et al (2004), Weber et al (2004) and Leiserowitz (2008)], and the effects of semantics on perceptions of the problem [Sinaceur et al (2005), Hardisty et al (2010), Kasperson et al (1988). 308 Oil DDW 2012 1 Yes Leakage 309 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 Unilateral emissions reductions benefits other countries, increasing their emissions van der Werf, Wageningen University, and Di Maria, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of Birmingham, 11 Edwin van der Werf, Wageningen University, and Corrado Di Maria, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of Birmingham, 5-11, [“Unintended detrimental effects of environmental policy: The green paradox and beyond,” CESIFO WORKING PAPER NO. 3...
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