57 concern about climate change is not high up the

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Unformatted text preview: coordination of a wide range of agencies and action on legal, regulatory and administrative fronts. Under the Saudi bureaucracy, this would appear more painful than investing in new, large-scale energy supplies, but would ultimately pay back greater dividends for future generations. 121 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 No transition to efficiency – Saudis see climate change mitigation as a plot from the outside Lahn, Research Fellow for Energy and Development at Chatham House and Stevens, Senior Research Fellow for Energy at Chatham House and Emeritus Professor at Dundee University, 11 Glada Lahn, Research Fellow for Energy and Development at Chatham House and Paul Stevens, Senior Research Fellow for Energy at Chatham House and Emeritus Professor at Dundee University, 12-11, [“Burning Oil to Keep Cool The Hidden Energy Crisis in Saudi Arabia,” The Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, www.chathamhouse.org/publications/papers/view/180825] E. Liu Environmental awareness is culturally new in the country although there are some nascent attempts to promote it through Islam and local community improvement projects.57 Concern about climate change is not high up the agenda in Saudi Arabia or indeed elsewhere in the GCC countries. Although the phenomenon is widely accepted, many still regard the multilateral agenda to mitigate it by reducing CO2 emissions as a ‘plot’ to undermine the oil-exporting countries . By contrast, local air pollution is an issue of public concern, not least because its impacts are tangible and immediate. As in most other developing countries, the argument for greater efforts to reduce fuel use is more likely to be won through appeals to concerns about the effects on health than to concerns about climate change. 122 Oil DDW 2012 1 AT: Oil Disease 123 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 Saudi spending goes towards diversification and job creation Cordesman, senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, 11 Anthony H. Cordesman, senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), 2-26-11, [“Understanding Saudi Stability and Instability: A Very Different Nation,” CSIS, http://csis.org/publication/understanding-saudi-stability-and-instability-verydifferent-nation] E. Liu It is all too easy to focus on politics and ignore the quality of governance. The fact remains, however, that the way states actually spend their money is at least as critical a measure of their “legitimacy” as their politics. Saudi national budget and five year plans have consistently reflected the fact that Saudi leaders do not simply talk about reform and progress, they have made massive expenditures on every critical aspect of social welfare. Any examination of Saudi budgets, five-year plans, and the reports of the Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency since the mid-1970s, shows that Saudi Arabia has not suffered from the “petroleum disease.” Money has gone where it is needed and where it helps preserve stability. The government has invested massive amounts of money in job creation and pushed hard to reduce its...
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