78 l 100 km1 or gasoline fueled vehicles achieving in

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Unformatted text preview: ates 30–60 times higher than this target. Many other countries with historically low vehicle ownership (e.g., India and China) are rapidlymotorizing, increasingsuch emissionsbymorethan 5% 303 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 AT: LDV 304 Oil DDW 2012 1 Technology isn’t enough to solve LDV demand – Multifaceted efforts are key Sager, writer and PhD student in the Energy and Resources Group ( ERG) at the University of California, et al., 11 Jalel Sager, writer and PhD student in the Energy and Resources Group ( ERG) at the University of California, et al., Joshua S Apte1, Derek M Lemoine1,2and Daniel M Kammen, 11, [“Reduce growth rate of light-duty vehicle travel to meet 2050 global climate goals,” 2011 Environ. Res. Lett., http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/6/2/024018] E. Liu When considering the prospect of rapidly increasing LDV use, the Stern Review (Economics of Climate Change) found: ... at the global level, in the absence of policy interventions , the long-run positive relationship between income growth and emissions per head is likely to persist. Breaking the link requires significant changes in preferences, relative prices of carbon-intensive goods and services and/or breaks in technologica ltrends. Butalloftheseare possiblewith appropriate policies [15]. We concur with this assessment, and here lay out a set of interrelated targets needed to achieve low-carbon mobility. We find that innovation in a single area such as fuel economy does not offer a realistic, affordable, or resilient pathway to the LDV emission reductions necessary by midcentury. Instead, as social, technical, and infrastructural drivers of LDV GHG emissions interact multiplicatively, the responsibility should be spread over a portfolio of achievable improvements across the transport system. 305 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 They can only solve warming technology alone through non-existent 1000 mpg vehicles Sager, writer and PhD student in the Energy and Resources Group , et al., 11 Jalel Sager, writer and PhD student in the Energy and Resources Group ( ERG) at the University of California, et al., Joshua S Apte1, Derek M Lemoine1,2and Daniel M Kammen, 11, [“Reduce growth rate of light-duty vehicle travel to meet 2050 global climate goals,” 2011 Environ. Res. Lett., http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/6/2/024018] E. Liu Global growth of per capita LDV use to levels on a par with contemporary high-income countries would likely be incompatible with climate goals. For example, with global per capita LDV use of 10000 km yr−1, GHG propulsion intensity would need to decline from current levels of ∼300 to ∼5–10 g CO2-eq km−1on a ‘well-to-wheel’ (WTW, fuel lifecycle) basis. As the matrix of vehicle technology options in figure 2 shows, this performance level would require universal deployment of one or more of the following clusters: electric vehicles (EVs) running on nearly zero-carbon electricity, cellulosic-biofuel-powered vehicles achieving 300 miles per gallon (mpg; 0.78 L 100 km−1), or gasoline-fueled vehicles achieving in excess of 1000 mpg (0.24 L 100 km−1). Such levels of performance exceed optimistic technology scenarios for the year 2050 [16, 17]. 306 Oil DDW 2012 1 Warming Is Systemically Under...
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2013 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Burke during the Spring '13 term at Southern Arkansas University.

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