Because the transport sector is by itself responsible

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: he United States, the European Union (EU), and Japan have recently announced important new programs to increase research, development, and demonstration of hydrogen (H2) technologies, particularly for the transport sector. Hydrogen may enable transport sector diversification using energy produced from renewables, nuclear power, and clean fossil fuel technologies. Because the transport sector is, by itself, responsible for most of past and expected future growth of world oil demand, and because transport is 97% dependent on petroleum, these developments could have important impacts on oil markets and carbon dioxide emissions (Fig. 1). While energy efficiency policies can help to reduce the growth of fuel demand, a substantial decline of transportation energy demand is not likely (IEA 2001, 2002). Alternative transport fuels will be needed to achieve deep cuts in carbon emissions. 37 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 Link – Solving Climate Change 38 Oil DDW 2012 1 Transition from oil is key to prevent temperature increases Haug, former Director at the International Energy Agency (IEA), 11 Marianne Haug, former Director at the International Energy Agency (IEA), 11, [“Clean energy and international oil,” Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Volume 27, Number 1, 2011, pp. 92–116, oxrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/1/92.abstract] E. Liu The imperatives of climate change and the conventional wisdom could not be further apart. The climate change challenge— limiting temperature increases to 2 degrees Celsius above the temperature level reached at the beginning of the twentieth century—requires that by 2050 carbon emissions from energy-related activities worldwide be cut in half compared to the present. This can only be achieved through a drastic reduction of fossil fuel use, including oil ; decarbonization of the electricity system; and major improvements in end-use efficiency for buildings, transport, and industry. Putting conventional wisdom aside, policy-makers and companies alike call for an ‘energy revolution’ with low-carbon energy at its core. A diminishing role for oil is implicit in such transition. 39 Last printed 9/4/2009 7:00:00 PM Oil DDW 2012 1 Link – Solving Sprawl 40 Oil DDW 2012 1 Sprawl makes high oil consumption inevitable – Automobile dependence and more driving Gonzalez, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami, 06 George A. Gonzalez, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami, 8-06, [“An Eco-Marxist Analysis of Oil Depletion via Urban Sprawl,” Environmental Politics, Vol. 15, No. 4, 515–531, August 2006, http://ipac.kacst.edu.sa/eDoc/2006/159166_1.pdf] E. Liu In their reports, both these groups called for greater energy efficiency, or what they labelled in their reports as ‘conservation’. The difficulty is that increased energy efficiency does not necessarily reduce overall consumption levels. The energy policy group, in a section of its report entitled...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online